Is this groundhog or gopher ?


  #1  
Old 07-21-20, 10:25 AM
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Is this groundhog or gopher ?

Found it inside my fenced vegetable garde today morning. I chased and then sprayed water from my garden hose to drive it out . It was struggling to come out ... (so apparently unable to climb ) , finally escaped through gate. Noticed it went under my shed.
Questions --
1) is this groundhog or mole ?

2) how do I control it ?

Could not find how it got in . There was a hole dug under fence yesterday. I closed that and used additional chicken fence burying under the ground 6" . Didn't see any new hole today.


 
  #2  
Old 07-21-20, 10:28 AM
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Correction ... wanted to mean groundhog or gopher
 
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Old 07-21-20, 10:33 AM
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Thats a woodchuck / ground hog!

They dig so your doing the right thig but may need to go deeper!
 
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Old 07-21-20, 11:41 AM
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Thanks ! Half of my garden is gone before I could identify the root cause ( I was thinking rabbit) and using useless anti animal chemicals

As of now, all zuchhini, cucumber and beans are gone ... hope tomatoes , potatoes and beets will survive
 
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Old 07-21-20, 12:59 PM
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That's a groundhog. In Pennsylvania Dutch, "whistle pig."

Tradition Pennsylvania Dutch (NOT Amish) gardens were located a few hundred feet out the back door, almost always "at dead sight" and generally had a hill or woodpile behind them as a backstop.
"At dead sight" is a hunter's term for the range where the rifle sights are "dead on" and you don't have to compensate for the bullet dropping 3" or 6" due to air resistance and slowing over long distances.

 

Last edited by Shadeladie; 07-22-20 at 07:02 AM. Reason: Umm, no way this is staying here
  #6  
Old 07-21-20, 01:27 PM
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Ground hog for sure. They are VERY persistent when they find a good food source. They are prolific diggers, I could almost admire them...

If he doesn't get discouraged by your efforts, then trapping, shooting (if viable) may become best alternatives.
 
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Old 07-21-20, 05:48 PM
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Thanks all ! I am wondering if a spiked strip will deter them ?
planning to use some ply strips, hammer nails so that it protrudes from the other side and lay those against perimeter... any idea if that might work ?
 
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Old 07-21-20, 08:22 PM
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Very doubtful. they will just dig further from the fence and go under them.
 
  #9  
Old 07-22-20, 05:52 AM
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A groundhog is basically a big fat squirrel -
They can climb like a squirrel; (I've seen them 20 feet up in a mulberry tree) and they can dig around as fast as a human with a post hold digger.

You can try "marking YOUR territory" by spreading used cat litter OUTSIDE the garden, or having a dog 'mark' their territory around the garden.
 
  #10  
Old 07-24-20, 08:13 AM
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As far as the nail board idea, I had a nuisance wildlife license for some years while also doing pest control. One customer had a ground hog right next to the house. Prior to calling me, he had broken bottle glass and threw it in the hole and runway but to no avail. When I was setting the trap, I noticed all the glass as well as multiple blood spots. They are hardy creatures.
 
  #11  
Old 07-24-20, 08:54 AM
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Originally Posted by PAbugman[color=#222222
They are hardy creatures.
And they build up a thick layer of fat for insulation, hibernation, AND wound protection.
Roman gladiators used the same trick.
Gladiators were built like 1970s pro wrestlers or NFL linemen, they were called "barley eaters;" because they would "carbo load" to put on weight and get a protective layer of fat that protected vital organs and blood vessels..

When a groundhog OR gladiator suffers a cut it generally only penetrates the skin and fat, it doesn't get down deep enough to sever blood vessels or puncture vital organs. So they live to fight another day.
 
 

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