Fire ants


  #1  
Old 07-14-04, 08:45 AM
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Fire ants

I found a great a ant killer but I do not know if it will work on Texas fire ants what do you guys think I have C/P the article:




Diatomaceous Earth
Diatomaceous Earth! This stuff is wonderful and it's safe. It is a powder that comes from the skeletons of a class of algae called diatoms. You merely sprinkle the powder where you have seen the ants and its kills them by drying them up. I have even read lately that it is safe for pets to ingest, to kill intestinal parasites (although I don't know if I would recommend that just yet). I have used it in my home successfully against ants, and I keep cats, birds, and reptiles, none of which suffered any ill effects from the DE. You can purchase DE at a health food store, natural gardening center, or even one of those large home centers (I recently saw it with the bad pesticides at Lowe's).
Good Luck!
Melissa G.
Licensed Raptor and Reptile Rehabilitator

What do you guys think I have tons of this stuff for my pool filter and it would be lots cheaper then Amdro fire ant killer.
 
  #2  
Old 07-14-04, 02:42 PM
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yes, DE will kill fire ants. it cuts the exoskeleton of the ants and the will dry out. it wont work as fast as conventional chemicals but if you are patient, it works. you do have to handle it with respect as it is dangerous if you get it in your eyes or inhale it. also i think you must use the food grade DE if you feed it to your animals.
 
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Old 07-14-04, 06:22 PM
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I will try it

Ok thanks I will give it a try what have I got to lose.I am not going to be feeding any to my dogs so the pool stuff is good enough.I wonder if it will also kill crickets and spiders since I have lots or them around the garden and pool.Thanks again.
 

Last edited by michael van; 07-14-04 at 06:23 PM. Reason: missspell
  #4  
Old 07-16-04, 01:19 AM
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Texas fire ants

Red imported fire ants, a native of South America, first arrived in the United States in Mobile, Ala., on ships in the 1930s. They probably arrive in soil used as ballast in ships. The pest quickly spread, reaching Texas in the 1950s, and now infest more than 80 million acres, mainly in the eastern two-thirds of the state. The annual cost data in the survey does not include some multiple family housing and businesses or costs borne by electrical utility companies, communications firms and cable companies.

The rainy, cool days of spring excite red fire ants. Texas Dept. of Agriculture recommends bait. Once the temp gets above 65 degrees, you are going to have fire ant problems. Ants are out and about and forage for food. You will see mounds. This is the best time to start control measures. This is when you see mounds and ants are building mounds, having babies, and looking for food.

Texas Dept. of Agriculture recommends a Two-Step Program (Thank goodness it is not a 12 step program!). They are using organic products in their plan, which will make organic gardeners happy. The first step is to Use ant bait that gets carried back to colonies. The bait is broadcast. It contains food and insecticide. It should be applied in fall and spring over the whole yard. Worker ants carry it back to the colony where it kills off the relatives and prevents new mounds.

Because not all organic baits or chemical controls are available in all areas, it is best to contact your local Dept. of Agriculture Extension Agent for recommended controls in your area. Baits need tp be applied when ants are looking for food. Any insect control requires patience and persistence.

When temps reach 70-90 degrees, usually May-September, it's time to move because that is when ants forage. You can make sure they are active by placing some potato chips or other tasty treat on mounds to see if they take the bait. Then, drench the mounds. Your local Dept. of Agriculture Extension Agent should tell you what is recommended in your area for both organic and chemical control measures for drenching mounds.
 
 

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