White globs in lawn


  #1  
Old 09-09-04, 09:27 AM
Danimal2
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Unhappy White globs in lawn

We had a new lawn put in about 2 months ago. Recently we have been seeing these white globs stuck to the blades of grass. The largest are probably an inch in diameter, the smallest are the size of a dime. I am assuming that they are some sort of nest but I have no idea what they are or how to treat them. Does anyone know what these might be?

Thanks,

Dan
 

Last edited by Danimal2; 09-09-04 at 10:08 AM.
  #2  
Old 09-09-04, 02:36 PM
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without more info, i would say you are describing mushrooms of some kind.
have you tried breaking one open?
 
  #3  
Old 09-09-04, 02:42 PM
Danimal2
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I haven't broken one open....yet. I fear that I will realease thousands of nasty bugs....but I am going to have to try. They are not your usuall mushroom...no stalk. The are attached to the blades of grass. Fairly irregual in their shape and consistency.

My newest theory is slime mold!
 
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Old 09-09-04, 08:26 PM
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Nope,

They are leaf hopper eggs and the white protective foam.
Pick one apart and you will see the little larva inside. A heavy spray of water will also wash them away. They are usually found on larger plants, flowers, weeds, etc.

fred
 
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Old 09-09-04, 08:31 PM
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Red Thread Disease

This does not sound like an insect problem. It sounds more like a fungus. Red Thread Disease produces white globs of fungus spores. As disease advances there will be red or faded patches, reddish or pink threads reaching from leaf tips to adjoining leaves. Slime mold produces patches of white/gray/black deposits on leaves. May appear powdery in early stages, but it forms tiny balls as the infection matures. Remove with a rake, broom or by spraying with a garden hose. Neither of these conditions produces permanent damage.

Remove grass clippings from infected areas. Avoid walking through the area and clean any tools you have used before they come in contact with other parts of the lawn. That includes lawn mower blades. These measures will hopefully prevent disease from spreading.

A fungicide can be used. Make sure you choose one that's formulated for the specific disease that's affecting your lawn. Follow the manufacturer's instructions carefully. Spot treat only. Do not apply to entire lawn. Some plant diseases become resistant to fungicide.

A good resource is your Dept. of Agriculture Extension Agent who should be able to help you identify your problem. Clip some of the affected grass blades and take to the Agent's office for identification. Because not all chemicals are approved in all areas of the country, the Agent should be able to recommend a product for where you live.
 
  #6  
Old 09-10-04, 08:34 AM
Danimal2
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Thanks for the info! Sounds like its ugly but harmless!

Dan
 
  #7  
Old 09-10-04, 03:00 PM
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Hi Dan,

Check it out for us.
If it looks like beaten egg white foam, it's just a lil bug in there.

If not, then it could be the fungus as mentioned.

fred
 
  #8  
Old 09-13-04, 06:36 PM
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I forgot about the leaf hoppers. Spittle bugs are a type of leafhopper. They produce a mass of spittle, and then hide inside. They rarely need to be controlled. They don't harm people, but the insects will suck the juices out of the grass blades. Do post back and let us know what you have there.
 
 

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