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How to get rid of household mice; traps with cheese or peanut butter are not working.

How to get rid of household mice; traps with cheese or peanut butter are not working.


  #1  
Old 02-18-00, 09:11 PM
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I need your help. How can I get rid of mice? Any suggestions? Do exterminators take care of this problem or is there some other way??
 
  #2  
Old 02-23-00, 05:47 AM
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I lived in an old house that was infested with them. We went to the grocery store and bought "Mice Baits" and thinned out their population rapidly. They are in a small yellow box and contain a food that mice cannot resist. It also contains poison. The mice eat the bait and crawl away to die. We never saw a carcass. Just place the baits around the house and you will be free of them in a week.

Hope that helps.

Smokey
 
  #3  
Old 02-26-00, 02:01 PM
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Hi!
How about one of those "have-a-heart" traps? They're designed so you can let the little guys go again. (Maybe in a field or atleast a few doors down from where you live!) Anyway, we've used them in the past and they work quite well. I was always afraid if I poisoned them they'd crawl into the house someplace, die and then stink to high heaven. If you decide to go with the trap, you first have to find where they're coming in and fill the hole with steel wool and patch it. Or even better yet, how about a cat! Good Luck!

~Fuzzicatz

[This message has been edited by fuzzicatz (edited February 26, 2000).]
 
  #4  
Old 02-26-00, 05:24 PM
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We have had good success getting rid of mice by placing d-con under the house on plastic throwaway tv dinner plates (prevents ground moisture from ruining them). On the rare occasion that one makes it up into the house because I haven't replaced the d-con in a while, we trap them with cheese or peanut butter wrapped with sewing thread (catches in their teeth, so they just can't eat and run). Pets are also attracted to d-con, so make sure that no dogs or cats can get to it under the house. VERY killer stuff. Good Luck!
 
  #5  
Old 03-05-00, 11:36 AM
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We seem to have trouble with Rats as we live close to the water...why rats, I don't know. Ugh. Anyway, we have success with using peanut butter rubbed into a cotton ball that is used for bait. This makes the critter work for his last meal.
 
  #6  
Old 03-07-00, 02:48 AM
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Mice hate mint so put some strong smelling mint leaves around the place and they won't come near.
I don't think it is a good idea to use poisons at all as they could be eaten by the wrong animal or they could get into the food chain i.e. some other animal may eat the animal you have poisoned.
 
  #7  
Old 03-07-00, 03:41 AM
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Sue Kneil:
Thanks for emailing me your response here. I agree with you when that's possible, but I happen to live on the Albemarle Sound (NC)waterfront side of a huge truck farm that double-crops things like string beans and sweet corn. When the weather turns cool in the Fall, the mice hoard would just add the mint to their julips, and keep on rolling. It's either d-con or machine guns nests and claymores, but my wife didn't like the noise.
 
  #8  
Old 04-21-00, 04:29 AM
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I also had a very bad mouse problem. I put out a peanut butter flavored block bait purchased from an exterminator chain. Swear that the mice ate it as I had to keep putting out more but at the same time I kept seeing more and more mice.

Couldn't set the usual spring mouse trap as it would spring before I'd get it set down.

A reusable covered trap with like a clip at the back worked pretty good. Once it was sprung, you just pressed on the back and dropped out the very grossly dented body. Glue traps worked good. Traps would mostly catch just the babies. Would still find traps sprung and bait gone even after it was tied on. Also, food bait traps are not effective if the mice are in the pantry or have other access to food.

Tried small plastic covers with car antifreeze. Supposed to be very attractive and toxic to animals.
Don't know if worked or not.

Electronic devices "Guaranteed to drive away" had absolutely NO effect, even when placed close to a hole where I saw activity and wall where I heard them.

Finally went with d-Con and an agressive trapping program and that seemed to get rid of the unwanted critters.

On the Milwaukee Humane Society adoption form, under why wanted a cat, I selected "companion" and "mouser" and they TURNED ME DOWN because mouser was checked,
"The cat might be hurt and not all cats will kill mice." (And to that I'd add, to anyone thinking about a cat, A kitten's teeth are too small, and if taken away from mamma at eight weeks, they haven't even learned how to hunt from her. So don't even think of getting a kitten to take care of the mice problem!)

(Ferrets are also supposed to be good mouse killers. Snakes also eat mice, but slowly.)

One other comment here, had squirrels in the attic at a previous house. For critters that only weigh a few ounces, they sounded like a herd of horses on the ceiling. Well, the trap door got worked open, and the closet door left open and the squirrels got into the house. Totally ignored my stash of bags of nuts and instead chewed open the bags of chocolate covered cream drops. Boy did they leave a mess! Cream drops with one bite out of it ALL OVER the house. (To say nothing of the tail end leavings.)


PS now that the mouse problem has been eliminated, I have two delightful farm cats companions and even though they were "trained" and by me dragging the toy mouse on a string to all the places were I had mouse activity, the occasional mouse body I've found, shows no signed of being touched by a cat.
 
  #9  
Old 05-20-00, 08:36 PM
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Interesting story:

I bought a neat older house on a creek lot and cul-de-sac. It's two story with solid cedar siding and a huge deck that wraps around the house on the creek side. If it walks, crawls or flies I think it lives on my property.

The first Autumn I was here, just as the weather started turning cold, I saw a mouse scamper across my deck. Within two days I saw one in my kitchen and I just about flipped. I have two large dogs and small children so poisons for me was not a good answer. I really wasn't sure what to do. A couple of days later I was sitting with a friend in my gameroom and I heard this scampering run the course of one full wall and then across the ceiling. The noise was so loud that I KNEW it was a big creature up there. A few minutes later, while still listening to the scurring above my head, I heard another set of feet scurring up the wall and across the ceiling as well. I sat there dumbfounded as to how I was going to get rid of whatever it was that was up there having a party.

I put off the task of doing anything about it for several days as I was going out of town. When I came back, there were no signs of any mice and I didn't see any more mice, rats or other annoying rodents (squirrels) around my property at all.

One evening my Rhodesian Ridgeback (hunting dog) went bizerk down in the yard by the gameroom wall. I went to investigate and discovered that she had treed a *huge* racoon. The coon scoffed at Gretta from the treetops and then made this magnificant leap to the roof and disappeared.

The next autumn rolled around and again, as soon as the weather started turning cold, I saw a mouse scamper across my deck. Three days later that familiar scurring across my gameroom ceiling. Once again, I never saw another mouse. This went on for 7 years.

I had an electrician go up into the attic above my gameroom every two years to see if there was any damage from the Raccon's that lived up there every winter. He said that they only built a nest made of some insulation and leaves and that even the wood beam that it was next to was not chewed on. The gameroom was an addition onto the original house so its attic is seperate from the attic of the main house.

For me it was a you scratch my back and keep the mice and rats at bay and I'll scratch yours and give you a safe place to hold up every winter. My dogs love the challenge of trying to tree the creatures and if I don't have to use poisons and they aren't doing any damage I can see no reason to make them leave.

Sometimes its worth it to share your property with preditors.
 
  #10  
Old 05-22-00, 12:47 PM
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quote:<HR>Originally posted by gloria312:
I need your help. How can I get rid of mice? Any suggestions? Do exterminators take care of this problem or is there some other way??
<HR>


 
  #11  
Old 05-24-00, 08:13 PM
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quote:<HR>Originally posted by gloria312:
I need your help. How can I get rid of mice? Any suggestions? Do exterminators take care of this problem or is there some other way??
<HR>

Get a cat. I live in the country and that was the only way I could get rid of them. We would catch five(in traps)in the same spot within a couple of hours. So i got a cat and I haven't even seen a mouse since.
 
  #12  
Old 05-27-00, 07:11 PM
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Strangely enough I found there are different type mice and you need different approaches for each.

The normal house mouse is easy to catch with all sort of methods, I like peanut butter or cheese.

I've found there is a little grey field mouse that prefers to live outdoors and will only come in the house under extremely climate conditions. Apparently they don't like the smells.

Bear to catch. I tried everything and won't take the bait. Finally got them using dog food pellets dipped in canned dog food. They gave me the solution themselves by chewing into the dog food bag, weren't so smart after all.

Also found my dog can smell them and she tells me exactly where to set the traps.

You can tell the difference. The outside grey ones do not leave dropping like a normal mouse. Must be shy, cause sure don't do it in the open.

Plus they would come and run around in the daytime. Definitely a different breed. And they breed like wildfire, caught like 30 in a few days, once I had the secret.


 
  #13  
Old 06-03-00, 02:34 PM
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Check all open spaces around pipes, etc. Plug these with pieces of steel wool - very -very coarse - and in some cases - put in bits of broken glass - BE VERY CAREFUL - this usually stops them from coming in - since they can usually chew thru anything. Seems they will always be outside - try to stop them from coming in when possible.
 
  #14  
Old 06-07-00, 11:56 PM
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Try chocolate. I use a chunk of Hersheys plain and always get the mouse. I moved into an apartment complex that had a large field next door. The onsite manager suggested the chocolate after calling 9-1-1 when I woke the whole place up with my screaming at midnight. Frankly, I think he would have screamed too if one was in his bed.
 
  #15  
Old 07-30-02, 05:50 PM
mrs.clueless
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Gum!!! they love gum, works every time!!! the sweeter the better.
 
  #16  
Old 07-31-02, 05:01 PM
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Honestly, the cat is the single best method!! I lived in a fraternity house for a while a long time ago. The mouse problem got real bad. So bad, that I would set two traps in my room, and catch them every night!! Often, I would nail 2 o3 at the same time with one springloaded trap!! Seems that they can reproduce faster than you can set the traps.

Then we got a cat. Overnight, and I do mean overnight, there were no more mice. Gone. My trap never went off again!
 
  #17  
Old 07-31-02, 05:13 PM
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Yep, cats are a great answer unless you have one that brings them to you as presents! At least they're dead.

By the way, I have about 4 too many if anyone is interested. 3 females aprx. 2 months old, and 1 female 11 months old.

Kay
 
  #18  
Old 08-02-02, 04:40 PM
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Mice control

Sealing all entries to your home will tend to keep insect and rodent pests at bay. Traps and baits tend to be the most popular methods of control. Folks who feed birds and pets outdoors tend to have more problems with mice control.

http://www.bugspray.com/article/rats.html
 
  #19  
Old 08-02-02, 06:14 PM
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Stuck on mice

Near the entrance to the basement I put down a "Victor Mouse Glue Trap". It's a 5 X 8 inch flat sheet with a very very sticky glue on it. The package says NOTHING about it being toxic.
 
  #20  
Old 08-04-02, 02:09 AM
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actually, I have heard that the glue traps are real bad news because they get stuck, then actually break off their legs, and literally pull out of their skin because that stuff is so sticky, then you have to throw away an animal that is still alive, and is literally pulling itself apart to death...Not real humane
 
  #21  
Old 08-04-02, 10:14 AM
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I have heard about that, too. I've never used anything like that since I have children that are too curious for their own good at times.

I don't guess I've been faced with it since I've had cats for the past 5 years. The Catahoulas in the backyard also catch mice and other rodents.

The downside is: having to deal with the problems cats cause inside and out, as well as having dogs dig up spots trying to get to rodents.

There never seems to be one perfect solution. I've heard of people living out in the country near crop fields, having dogs and cats, both inside and out, and still having rodent problems. I agree with Twelvepole in that securing your home against easy entry is your first step, and then you can work from there. Keeping pets food and water bowls away from the house is a must. Almost like the same plan you would use for a burgular: just make it harder on them and maybe they'll go for the next house instead of yours.

Kay
 
  #22  
Old 08-16-02, 04:45 PM
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from their mothers and from other cats. if the mother was not a mouser, if the kitten was taken away from the mother too soon , if the mother was not allowed to bring the kittens outside and catch a mouse for them to play with before she killed it or if the cat is just plain stupid, it will not become a mouser. the best way to select a mouser is to start watching it while it is too young to leave the mother. look for a kitten that is playful,alert, curious and leaves the safety of the rest of the pack to investigate noise or movment. this will take a few visits as kittens are born with their eyes sealed closed and unable to walk. when thier eyes open they cannot focus for a while. look for a mother that calls her kittens out side when she brings home a mouse. the only drawback to a mouser is it brings you the dead mice it catches. taking two or more from the same litter is a good idea. cats hunt better in packs. one flushes the mouse out while the other one waits to ambush it when it runs by.
 
  #23  
Old 08-16-02, 04:49 PM
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first line should have read. not all cats are mousers. they learn to be mousers from their mothers. i dont know what went wrong.
 
  #24  
Old 08-16-02, 05:25 PM
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I agree with the fact that not all cats are mousers. I have one that will run from anything that runs toward him. The kittens have more fun with him! They like to see this big cat jump.

Kay
 
  #25  
Old 08-22-02, 10:03 PM
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I have a sure fire way of catching them...........

after you put the peanut butter on the trap (just a little through the hole), set the trap then sprinkle a little flour on it. They love the smell of the peanut butter and sometimes they even get to eat it but they cant resist rolling around in the flour and that is what nails them! It seems they like the flour on their skin.

we used to live in an old farmhouse and had a cat that was a good mouser in the basement all the time in the winter (she just lived down there), cut the problem down considerably.
 
  #26  
Old 08-30-02, 12:22 AM
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glue traps are horrible. They typically contain a bait on the glue. The mouse will flinch for hours before it dies. Its just not the way to go. Quick and painless not torture the beasts. Those "enviro care" save the mouse for release traps dont work so well. Half the time the mouse will die before you get it out. I prefer the old snap traps. The covered ones are cleaner if you dont enjoy dead mice sight. Dont use a rat trap for mice! seems like a great idea but whoa that larger spring.. it will rip the mouse in half .. not the kind of clean up you want trust me. I always learn the hard way.

Hope this helps-Josh
 
  #27  
Old 09-06-02, 11:27 AM
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Just another note on this topic. Terminix came to my house the other day to clear our roach problem. About 2 hourse b4, my wife had a mouse run across her foot. She freaked out, naturally. When terminix came, I told them, and they layed out glue traps.

Took less than 2 hours to snag one. Poor fellow was stuck solid on his side, everypart of his body was glued solid to that cardboard glue trap. He would blink a couple of times, wiggle his whiskers, and try like hell to move, then give up again, and try again.

Thanks a million! What the hell do I do with this. Now I have a live mouse stuck on a flat piece of cardboard that won't die for at least a few days until he dies of thirst or starvation. Naturally I dont' have the hard to smash him with a rock and put him out early, nor do I want to commit him to the trash live. I know he is just a rodent, but does he really deserve to be tortured this way?

Back to the old fashioned snap traps for me, and if that doesn't work...meowwww!
 
  #28  
Old 09-06-02, 11:46 AM
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You can put him in a plastic ziplock and freeze him. Seems to be lesser of evil ways to put him out of his misery. Another way is to drown him.

Yuk.

Kay
 
  #29  
Old 09-06-02, 11:57 AM
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i can top that. i read about a guy once who thought he had a mouse problem so he put mouse glue traps all over his kitchen. he was awaken by loud noises . he didnt have a mouse problem, he had a rat problem. a rat, being too big for the traps, had one trap on each foot and was flopping around like a seal. fortunatley, while the guy was laughing, the rat made a very slow comical escape . glue traps are supposed to work because when they get stuck, they put their face against the gule and push up. then they get their face stuck and suffocate. i use the old spring traps and cats. as for freezeing him, i read about another guy who tried that. not only didnt it die, it ate into everything in the freezer.
 
  #30  
Old 09-06-02, 12:10 PM
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I guess I should have noted that it would probably be a good idea to thump it in the head a couple of times to knock it out first.

Kay
 
  #31  
Old 09-08-02, 08:29 AM
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get rid of mice

Mashed potato powder or buds. Place instant mashed potato powder or buds in strategic places with a dish of water close by. After eating the powder or buds mice will need water. This causes fatal bloating. GOOD BYE my litte fury friends.
 
  #32  
Old 09-09-02, 11:08 AM
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Speaking of knocking them on the head, I have my technique down now. Catch in glue trap, walk to front yard, slam the whole trap with mouse upside down on concrete, throw away.

Has anyone tried the pellets? I think that they might be great at getting rid of all of them, but do they die in your walls and smell everything up?
 
  #33  
Old 09-09-02, 11:49 AM
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All the sites I've looked at regarding poisons of any kind state that no matter what the product claims, a mouse or rat will stink when it rots and dies. Where it dies, it up to the mouse.

The research sites state that products claiming that if you use their product that there will be no smell. They're full of it.

The pellets will work, but it is up to fate where the mouse will die. I've heard tales that if you remove water sources from the house (even droplets left in a sink) the mice will go outside to find water and die there. These sites say that this isn't the case. Poisons work with or without water. It isn't the active ingredient, unlike the post above using potato buds. That one I'm going to try around my dead tree in the backyard. They can die out there if they chose. Just not in my house!

Kay
 
  #34  
Old 01-05-05, 11:09 PM
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Cats that are good mousers

If you want a good mouser, find someone out in the country who has a good mouser Mother cat and leaves the "kittens" with her until they're half grown. The best mousers are not barely weaned; they're older kittens that have really learned to hunt.

The best mousers are long, thin cats with small heads who often prefer mice to any kind of cat food. Fat, lazy cats with big heads (like Morris) rarely catch mice. Often they won't even pay much attention if you drop a live mouse in front of them.

Has anyone tried Shake-Away to repel rodents (or anything else)? If you have, did it work?
 
  #35  
Old 12-07-05, 10:46 AM
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Lightbulb 1 Jammin Bait Clean And Tidy Mouse Trap Problem Solved By Me.. Yay!!

If you do a google seach for peanut butter not working or baiting a mouse trap and mouse trap bait you will find everything but the common sense approach.. This is the bait that works! First you will need the VICTOR brand of the traditional pedal with the round bait tubes.. I have used Peanut Butter for years and it always turned green sometimes catching a mouse before snapping and mostly turning rancid or getting licked off. I saw a comment about a person whom used super glue and an almond or nut and thought that was a great idea.. I one upped her... searched for "mice love to eat" and found the answer.. Thier favorite treat fits and jams in the trap bait holder from 3 angles.. they have to bite to get it and snappo deado... No more pests in the garage eating my pea or bean stash anymore.. I even place this bait out in the shed now and it lasts forever almost... Another idea is this 5 dollar plastic totes to store food in.. that keeps them out for good.

Jam these into your trap's bait holder from 3 angles firmly.. SUNFLOWER SEEDS!
 
 

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