chipmonks, I think??


  #1  
Old 11-04-04, 08:15 AM
deniseandnick
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
chipmonks, I think??

First of all, we live in the norhteast where it's getting cold quick.

I recently saw a chipmonk in my attached garage. Not sure if it entered while I had left the door open to do yard work or if there is another access point?? The rubber weather stripping on the bottom corner of the garage door is worn and probably a point of entry.

My wife has heard some scurrying durring the day time in the acoustical tile ceiling of an enclosed heated breezeway/porch between our garage and kitchen.

My first thought was the chipmonk I had seen in the garage has found a warm place to hang out, so I bought a have a heart trap and baited with raisins, apples slices and peanut butter and placed it in the garage, but haven't had a nibble yet??? This makes me think there may be another entry point.

What are the nesting/hibernation habits of chipmonks??? How long can they go without food and water? Are they still gathering food for the winter or have they packed it in already???


As a side note, I trapped mice in the attic 3 weeks ago. I've continued to leave baited traps up there, but the peanut butter bait hasn't been touched since the last kill.
 
  #2  
Old 11-07-04, 09:48 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,815
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Chipmunks

Mice tend to be nocturnal. Traps should be baited and placed along baseboard or along where floor joins wall as they tend to travel the perimeter of the room.

As cooler temps approach, many animals seek a warm place to overwinter and have babies. Make an inspection of the exterior of your home. Look for cracks and crevices where rodents, insects, and other pests can enter. These should be sealed, but not until after eradication of the pests. They will gnaw their way back in if sealed off before elimination.

Chipmunks are diurnal--active day and night. They will enter your home to overwinter if you provide them with the opportunity. Other animals include mice, rats, squirrels, raccoons, and oppossums. Rodent season starts in October when temps tend to get cool.

Chipmunks and other pests tend not to enter garages unless there is a food source. Folks tend to store grass seed, bird seed, and pet food there. Garage doors need to be properly sealed and foundation holes sealed. Squirrels love to invade attics and build homes in attics and behind soffit panels or in wall voids. All squirrels are active during the day, except for flying squirrels. Squirrels gnaw holes, chew wires and contaminate and stain surfaces with urine and droppings like mice and other rodents. They like to store pine cones and other foods that also attract beetles, moths, and mites. Rodent droppings are associated with human diseases such as hanta virus. Exclusion is the best control!

Most folks don't prevent invasion with exclusion. They wait until they hear scampering or gnawing in attics and walls and post here. Or, they may post when they see droppings in pantries, attics, garages, along baseboards and walls, or see gnawing on food products in overstocked pantries, or near pipes and vents. Sometimes pets may alert homeowners to pests because of pawing inside the home along walls, in pantries, or outside cabinets.

Because all this gnawing goes on, homeowners have to worry about gnawing through electric wiring and electrical fires. We read about fires in the local newspapers and that say it was electrical, but they never say why. We wonder? Rodents? Statistics reveal that more than one-fifth of the “fires of unknown origin” in the U.S. are probably caused by rodents’ gnawing matches or wiring.

Rodents also carry diseases and fleas and leave waste. Mice carry the hantavirus. People inhale the virus from airborne particles from droppings, urine, or saliva. 50% of the people who get it die. It is rare, but people do die from it.

Keep interior of home clean and practice good sanitation and leave no crumbs or spills, garbage, pet food, bird seed, or grain products that attract animal or insect pests. Don't leave pet food out at night. Place bird feeders away from home. Inspect dried flower arrangements and wreaths for pests. Seal garbage cans and keep areas around them clean with no trash or rubbish near them or your structure. Keep doors, windows, & vents sealed with no gaps. Seal all entries into structure. Keep all plantings at least 12" away from foundation. If in doubt, call a pest control professional.
 
  #3  
Old 11-07-04, 09:57 PM
GregH's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 10,237
Received 66 Upvotes on 61 Posts
I have had success baiting traps for both squirrels and mice with the same sunflower seeds they are attracted to.
 
  #4  
Old 11-07-04, 10:03 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,815
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Hello, GregH! What type of traps do you use? And, explain how you attach the sunflower seeds? Please post back with this information. Sunflower seeds are very tasty to both humans and animals.

Please explain what type of traps for squirrels and what type for mice. Also, please provide us with other exclusionary measures that you use. Do you have a high population of squirrels and mice on your property? Do you have nut or seed trees? Do your neighbors or you leave out pet food dishes or feed birds? Please post back and inform us about your particular environmental and exclusionary issues around your home. This informatin would be most enlightening and helpful to all. What do you do every fall to get your home ready for winter? Have you had pests inside your home? What did you do? How do you keep them out?
 
  #5  
Old 11-08-04, 04:43 PM
GregH's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Manitoba
Posts: 10,237
Received 66 Upvotes on 61 Posts
Sure, be happy to talk about my squirrely battles.

I use standard Victor wooden traps on mice and the larger Victor Rat traps on squirrels.
Our red squirrrels are fairly small and the rat traps work quite well.
I have experimented with recommended baits such as peanut butter and find the sunflower seeds that we use to feed birds is what they are seeking and works the best for us.
We place the seeds in a little pile, about a scant teaspoon full, around and on the trip lever and if they find the seed, they usually trip the trap.
Have had an occasional false trip but not too often.

We are in a rural area. Our yard is 1 1/2 acres and is more than half wooded with tall mostly thin cottonwoods............ Prime squirrel country.

We began feeding birds when we moved here 7 years ago and worked hard trying to squirrel proof everything.
We sealed openings to sheds, used closed garbage containers to store seed and bought squirrel resistant bird feeders.
This kept them away from the seed and feeder for the most part but then they began exploring for more food sources.
They would chew at the crack in the closed shed doors and chewed a hole in a plastic container that didn't ever contain foodstuffs of any kind. In fact the one it chewed through was a Rubbermade Action Packer that I use for packing tools for out of town trips.
Another contributing factor is that we are the only house in our immediate area that doesn't have a dog or cat to discourage them.
In fact, because of this, our yard seems to attract stray cats and their kittens that are "given a chance to live", by some not too bright folks from our neighbouring town, but this is another story.

I've given up on the soft approach in dealing with them and now exterminate them whenever I spot one.
Because of being in a rural setting with neighbours a safe enough distance away, I shoot them with a very low velocity .22 cal bullet.
For any that may be interested, these bullets are known as "22 cal CB short".
They have a velocity that is higher than an average pellet gun which makes them more accurate and much more humane than a pellet gun which is notorious for not making a clean kill. The velocity is low enough though to make them slightly safer than normal .22 cal ammunition.

This past summer was particularly bad, having had to deal with over fifty of them.
Now we're back to our normal one every couple of weeks.


As far as any other critters go, normal closing of openings seems to keep mice out of the house and sheds, even though I see them occassionally scurrying around outside.

Now if I can just find a way of shooing (not shooTing) away the Wood Frogs when I cut the grass in the summertime.
They're cute little creatures who are quite photogenic and don't mind sitting around getting their picture taken.
 
  #6  
Old 11-09-04, 06:23 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: USA
Posts: 15,815
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Greg, sounds like you have your rodent problems under control. Wood Frogs? I have them at my mountain cabin. They are really cute. Spied a little lump on my deck railing. It had the same grey weathered look as the deck. I grinned and left it alone. I love frogs.

Wood Frogs are found from Alaska through much of Canada where winters are very severe. They survive by being able to withstand being frozen down to -5°C (23°F) or lower. They do this by increasing the amount of glucose stored in their cell fluids. The high concentration acts as antifreeze, lowering the freeze point. By preventing the cells from freezing on the inside the cell membrane is not ruptured, and the frog survives. Nevertheless, 1/3 of the frogs body fluids, mainly interstitial fluids (fluids between the cells) can become frozen during the winter without harming the frog.

Where my cabin is located three-foot snowfalls are not uncommon. Last winter snow reached the top of my sliding glass doors because snow slid off the roof. Yes, I have a dropped ceiling, insulation, and ventilation problems. Just can't afford to do anything about it right now. Ice dams are common when I am snowed in and have my fireplace roaring.

If you have a problem with wood frog population you may be fighting a losing battle. To mate, males call females from the water. Their sound is usually a 'quack' sound that we hear. When a male sees another frog, he hugs it (called "amplexus" with frogs). Unfortunately, he can't tell a male from a female until he does. Once he hugs the other frog, he can feel if she is fat with eggs, or if he's grabbed another male. If he grabbed a male, that male will croak loudly, and this will make the first frog let go. When the frogs have mated, the female will lay a large egg mass, holding over 1000 eggs into the water. Usually, she attaches it to some sticks or stems of a plant. After breeding, wood frogs return to the woods away from the water. Wood Frogs eat beetles, flies, caterpillars, and other insects; and also spiders, other arthropods, slugs, snails, and worms. Perhaps treating lawn with insecticide to eliminate food sources may reduce problems with wood frogs in lawn.

I just can't help loving those little wood frogs and get excited every time I see one. I have been in love with frogs since I was a kid. No, I've never kissed one, but am seriously thinking about it because I need a change of lifestyle and my check book is suffering.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: