follow up re:mice in attic


  #1  
Old 11-09-04, 12:15 PM
deniseandnick
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follow up re:mice in attic

follow up re:mice in attic

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I understand that I need to close all openings that may allow mice to enter our home. Should I do this before or after I remove all the mice? Is it better to lock them in or out?? What's the best filler for the gaps?? I thought about the foam spry insullation, but figurted they'd just chew through.

The replys to my previous threads state to place traps against baseboards where droppings have been seen. Where should I place traps in the attic?? The mice appear to be between the ceiling and the insullation?? Will the mice change their pattern to go to a baitted trap?

With my wife's strong sense of smell I resist using poision because of the potential oder problem.

I've sucessfully killed two mice using the victor snap trap baited with peanut butter and placed just inside a crawl space door. I've rebaited the same snap traps and placed them in the same spot. I've heard more mice in the same general area, but the rebaited traps haven't been touched. Should I discard these snap traps and use new ones??


Tempted to give the glue boards a try, but once again, where do I put them??

If I have to use the poison, what kind and where do I put it??

What would a professional do differently??
 
  #2  
Old 11-09-04, 05:42 PM
T
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Mice

Remember the song "Three Blind Mice?" Mice really can't see more than a few inches in front of them. They navigate with whiskers and by running along something like walls. Traps really don't have to be baited. You can use any and all kinds, just put them where mice will likely run into them. Always place them up against the wall, perpendicular to the wall. Place several traps around the areas where you have seen mice or think they may travel. Move traps around to different positions each night. Mice are territorial, and will investigate their territory every day, so wherever a mouse travelled yesterday, he or she will most likely travel today. Set your traps.

Baits and poisons are not recommended because of potential odor problems if mice die in walls or inaccessible place where you can not locate them. Odor will subside once decomposition is complete.

Most professionals tend to recommend that exclusion take place after elimination of rodent pests inside structures because they will be relentless to gnaw their way back into their territories, especially if there are babies left inside. Any opening in foundation or into structure should be sealed. If your little finger can be placed into an opening, then a mouse can enter. As cold weather approaches, they seek shelter for winter and a place to have babies. Mice are naturally curious and will squeeze through openings just to see what's on the other side. If they like it better than outside, then they will stay, especially if they discover a food source. It's best to store all food in airtight containers, and this includes your pet food and bird seed. Don't leave out pet food dishes overnight on patio. Place bird feeders at the back of your property and not near the home. I have read that mice can squeeze through cracks as small as 1/4" and holes the size of a dime. Take no chances, whatever the size of opening because mice will gnaw and squeeze their way into your home simply because they are curious.

Thanks to Walt Disney, we think mice love cheese. Actually, they prefer grain products, thus peanutbutter is a better bait. Just a tiny smear will provide enough smell to attract mice. You can wrap the area (treadle) where bait goes with fine sewing thread before wiping on a tiny bit of peanutbutter. Some claim the thread gets their teeth caught and then the trap slams shut on them. Others claim a tiny drop of vanilla is all that is needed. Others claim a tiny bit of a cotton ball is all that is necessary because mice are always looking for nesting material. Traps should be placed where you see signs of mice. Use lots of traps! They are inexpensive and certainly less expensive than a professional. And, professionals usually use bait. Or, if they recommend traps, then it is your responsibility to check the traps.

Don't feed the birds. I know bird lovers don't want to hear this, but there are far too many posts on the internet forums about pest related problems associated with feeding birds. And, don't leave the pet food out overnight. You don't want your property to be a target for mice, rats, oppossums, raccoons, skunks, and other predators. We do wildlife no favors when we attract them from their natural feeding habitats.
 
  #3  
Old 11-10-04, 07:48 AM
deniseandnick
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What should I use to fill holes or crack that might be points of entry??

I've heard to use steel wool??

We don't have pets and the garbage is sealed in heavy duty rubbermaid containers.

The previous owners deifinitely fed the birds, we've already discarded the bird feeders. My guess is they stored the bird seed and even grass seed in the garage. Which I still think is the point of entry.

I've been hesitant to set traps in the garage because of my kids

I've had success with the sewing tread wrapped around the peanut butter on the snap traps, as well as a dab in the center of the glue traps. These have been placed in the eaves against the base of the knee wall.

I guess I'll continue doing what I've been doing, but maybe add more traps.
 
  #4  
Old 11-10-04, 03:39 PM
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Sealing gaps

Large openings such as around pipes and wires can be filled with foaming styrofoam. Wear gloves and don't get it on anything you don't want it on because it's impossible to remove. Have a trash bag ready for disposal of gloves and container. Caulk can be used for smaller gaps. Stainless steel scrubbies can be used to fill in holes or gaps. Steel wool will rust and deteriorate. It's difficult to exclude mice from garages because they sneak under the door. Perhaps you can use some tamper proof bait in the garage. Place it along walls on each side of garage door.
 
 

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