Mice droppings a problem?


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Old 01-26-05, 04:19 PM
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Mice droppings a problem?

Just found 2 dead mice in garage from posion traps. If I can't clean up all the mouse droppings and stains (urine?), what danger is there in leaving it? Is it a danger to toddlers? I will get most of the droppings, but some seems hard to get to for an adult, especially the stains.
 
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Old 01-27-05, 05:25 AM
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I wouldn't be overly concerned and would clean it with a shop vac and some soapy water. If you want to be sure the urine is gone, a black light will
make the stain visible so you can clean further. If you ever have to clean a great deal of mouse waste, wet it down with a anti-viral/bacterial spray and clean it with a vacumn with a HEPA filter. Good luck, Rick.
 
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Old 01-27-05, 03:03 PM
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Mice droppings clean up

The key is not to get the mouse droppings or urine particles airborne. You do not want to breathe the airborne particles. Do not raise any dust. Do not vacuum. Wear a dust mask and make sure it fits closely around nose and mouth. Don't touch mask after you start cleaning. Replace mask if it becomes soiled. Thoroughly wet droppings and urine with bleach/water solution (1/4 cup in one gallon water). Wet down contaminated area with solution. Wear rubber gloves and collect droppings with paper towels and place in garbage bag. Once area is free of droppings, go back and disinfect the entire area again. Pick up any dead mice with rubber gloves and small plastic bag. Turn bag inside out so you do not touch the mouse. Tie the bag. NEVER vacuum mouse droppings because you don't want to take the chance of releasing hanta virus into air through vacuum. Wash hands thoroughly after cleaning even though you wore rubber gloves.
 
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Old 02-01-05, 11:52 PM
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Twelvepole has some good advice for you, however I dont know that I would agree with never vacuuming. The key if you do plan on using a vacuum is to be absolutely sure it has a HEPA filtration system in it. That way it is not going to release any particles into the air. I would also caution you whenever working with rodent droppings in your area to wear protective clothing such as a respirator approved by OSHA for such use, rubber gloves, and a protective covering over your shirt. I will let you decide on what you want to wear for that. As you have probably read in the news the Hanta Virus IS NOT something to play around with. I think if it were me I would clean up what was reachable by the children and pets and by moving furniture and I would leave the rest of it be. The urine is something you will not be able to get all cleaned up. I would not take a blacklight to your house, you will be sorry you did. Trust me on this one, it will show up every speck of dirt or food or each small stain on the floors cabinets and surfaces making your home look like it hasnt been cleaned in months. You can clean it the best you can and the cleaning supplies you use leave behind a film that will cause the blacklight to show it. I made that terrible mistake one time and onetime only. It almost ended a marriage and ended me up in court for the couples divorce.

I wish you all the very best.

Tim Wise

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
 

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Old 02-03-05, 07:45 PM
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The EPA instructs that mouse droppings not be vacuumed because of the chance of releasing particles into air. HEPA filters do not block 100%.
According to the EPA, Type A HEPA filter, the filter must capture at least 99.97% (9,997 out of 10,000) of particles 0.3 microns in sizeľabout 300 times smaller than the diameter of a human hair, and 25 to 50 times smaller than we can see. To a HEPA filter, catching a one-micron particle (1/1,000,000 of a meter) is like stopping a cotton ball with a door screen. However, manufacturing a filter with HEPA filter media does not mean that the filter itself meets true HEPA efficiency requirements. There can be serious filter leakage if filters are not individually tested during the manufacturing process. A pin hole leak or a breach in the seal can cause leakage. thereafter. Many filters are marketed as HEPA "type" and there is a big difference between true HEPA filters. HEPA type filters are lucky to capture 55% of particles (5,500 out of 10,000). Thuys, the Type A HEPA filter is 1,800 times more efficient than the HEPA type filters marketed and sold on many household vacuums.

The average homeowner may or may not know the difference between a true HEPA filter & one that has been marketed & sold as a HEPA type filter. Marketing the acronym HEPA ("High Efficiency Particulate Air" or "High Efficiency Particulate Arrestance.") does not guarantee that the filter is manufactured, tested and certified to meet Institute of Environmental Sciences and Technology (IEST) construction, performance and certification standards as currently published in IEST RP-CC001.3. Thus, I would be hesitant to recommend vacuuming because of this issue.

Bleach/water solution to disinfect will not leave behind any residue. It is the standard solution recommended by the EPA for disinfecting. If in doubt, read the following article published by the Dept. of Agriculture http://www.montana.edu/wwwpb/pubs/mt9404.html and this article
http://www.uidaho.edu/safety/rodent.htm There are others on the internet that explain concerns about hantavirus and instruct you on proper cleanup of rodents and droppings and health related issues.
 
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Old 02-07-05, 11:34 AM
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How long does dead mouse smell?

Frustrated with the small mouse sticky tray traps and snappers, I decided to use poison and rat size sticky trays and snappers. I think our visitors were the "deer mouse" variety but I am no expert. One was moving so slow that I thought the next one I saw would move just as slow too. So I left that one in a large sticky trap for many hours thinking he would just die. Nope. He disappeared.

Killed another one with a shovel after being stuck on a large sticky. Small stickys trap their hair and that's about all.

Now we smell something awful whenever we go to the garage. Can't find the dead one, but there are some small openings in the wall for sewer and electrical conduit access. I'm pretty sure a mouse ate the poison, went into the wall and died. Just looking for a ballpark number of days we can expect to smell the corpse.
 
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Old 02-07-05, 04:33 PM
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Depending on size of mouse, it may take several weeks until it completely decomposes. You can spray enzyme digester cleaner/deodorizer to help alleviate the odor. These can be found at homecenters and hardwares and are marketed under names like Out, OdoBan, Nature's Miracle. The odor problem is why baits and poisons are not recommended indoors because animals may die in walls or inconspicuous places.

You need to plug the entry into the wall. Use snap traps. Mice have been known to pull off a leg to escape these traps.
 
 

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