Concern about some animal droppings around the house


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Old 03-28-05, 07:54 PM
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Concern about some animal droppings around the house

Hi folks,
I have been seeing some dark color droppings around our house and am wondering what kind of animal it is from.
I have taken some pictures and posted them at:
http://www.fatourchi.com/droppings.html

Please advise if I should be concerned with this or how I can correct this problem.
Thanks.
 
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Old 03-28-05, 09:01 PM
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It's easier for the inexperienced tracker to identify animals by footprints than by scat. Sprinkle flour in areas where you usually see droppings and inspect the next morning for foot prints. Opossums have five little toes on front feet and four toes on back with opossable thumb. Back tracks may slightly overlap front ones, giving the impression of a larger animal.

A fox will leave prints similar to a dog's with four toes and a hind foot and scat will be similar to a dog's. Raccoons have five little toes on front and back that look like little hands. Scat is tubular and blunt on ends. Skunks have five toes on front and back with very long claws on back.

These are a few of the nocturnal animals usually found in and around homes. The purple color of scat appears that the animal has been eating some type of fruit or berries. And, all of these animals will eat berries.
 
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Old 03-28-05, 09:14 PM
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your comments about the scat color is fine, but what puzzles me is that it is cold and no fruits are out yet; and we don't have any garbage touched. So how can they be eating berries and sort?
I will do the flour tracking suggestion as soon as it stops raining.
Thanks.
 
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Old 03-28-05, 09:48 PM
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The bright purple color reminded me of wild pokeweed berries. Although animals tend not to touch them until foraging supplies run, such as during periods of heavy snow. Although prized by winter birds, the berries tend to be slightly toxic to mammals and can cause gastrointestinal problems. There are many wild plants that have berries for winter foraging for birds and mammals. Dried fruits left on trees and vines in gardens also attract birds and animals. If there is a wooded area nearby, a winter walk might reveal the food source.

Don't handle scat, due to bacteria, but take a stick and probe for seeds. In your color photo, there appear to be seeds that look like cherry pits.
 
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Old 03-29-05, 11:46 AM
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Your suggestion worked well. Please the pictures I have posed from the animalís track at:
http://www.fatourchi.com/droppings.html

It looks like a Raccoon, right?
In that case what do I need to do to make sure this guy does not come around again?
Our garbage cans have closed lids at all times and there has not been any rampage through our garbage yet.

Thanks again.
 
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Old 03-29-05, 09:41 PM
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Raccoon control

The best control for raccoons is trapping. Place trap along foundation or area where they are known to travel. Place a rock on top trap, as raccoons may turn over trap when trying to get to bait inside. Fish or berry paste make for a good bait.

Contact your local Dept. of Wildlife or Animal Control. Some states have very specific regulations about trapping, relocation, and euthanization.

For helpful links about raccoons go to

http://www.denvergov.org/AnimalContr...plate23329.asp

http://ohioline.osu.edu/w-fact/0007.html
 
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Old 04-02-05, 05:01 PM
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Um, this may sound like a stupid question, but why do you think you have to 'do' something about this animal? You say that it has not caused you any trouble, after all. Why not just let it go about its business? We have co-existed with raccoons and possums and coyotes and various other forms of wildlife next door in our park. They don't bother us, and we don't bother them. It's nice to have local wildlife. Many people are shut up in concrete boxes in cities and don't get to see anything wilder than the occasional pigeon.
 
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Old 04-02-05, 05:09 PM
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Many people express concern about raccoons around the home because they can be carriers of rabies. They also seek entry into the home if they find a way to enter into crawl spaces and attics. Oppossums, although unlikely a carrier of rabies, is also a scavenger pest like the raccoon and seeks entry into to garages, cellars, crawl spaces. Droppings left by these animals can contain parasites and disease. This may be a serious problem if there are pets and small children in the landscape.
 
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Old 04-02-05, 05:23 PM
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Droppings from any animal (or human) can cause disease. Opossums are remarkably resistant to rabies and are rarely infected. Raccoon droppings can transmit the eggs of a parasite known as Baylisascaris procyonis, a nasty little worm that encysts in mammalian brains.

However, there is a big difference between coexisting with local wildlife and encouraging it to frequent one's yard. As long as the house and any crawl spaces are kept sealed so that wildlife cannot enter, and no neighbours are feeding them, there is no need to trap and remove local wildlife that is not causing a problem. Relocated wildlife has a poor survival rate.
 
 

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