Do bees eat wood???

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Old 05-31-05, 11:53 AM
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Do bees eat wood???

While pushing our son on his new wooden playground, we noticed a large bumble bee flying about. It eventually crawled in a small hole in one of the upper beams of the playground. The hole was about 1/4" in diameter and was not there when we put the playground together. You can see what appears to be tiny little teeth marks, but otherwise it's a perfect hole. My question...do bees chew through wood? Also, what shall we do to get it to leave/get rid of it? We certainly don't need a bee colony hanging out in the beam of our kids' playground. Should I just spray in the hole and then pack it full of wood putty??
 
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Old 05-31-05, 12:14 PM
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Okay, I'm replying to myself. I have figured out that they're carpenter bees. Now, what should I do to get them out of the playground? I'm not crazy about putting poisons close to where my kids play, but also don't want a bees nest. Can I do anything to prevent them from starting a new nest elsewhere? The playground is not painted, by the way.
 
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Old 05-31-05, 05:29 PM
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Hi DenverDog-
Here's some info that you may find helpful:

http://www.uky.edu/Agriculture/Entom...ruct/ef611.htm

It looks like painting the playground equipment might do the trick.
 
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Old 05-31-05, 07:03 PM
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Here in the Keys, we have something similar known to us as leaf cutters. If you have ever watched one approach it's nest, they fly a specific patern. Moving one item along the way, completely baffles it. And if the nest is built in something portable, when the female is away getting another piece of leaf, try moving it. Just a few feet will work. They can't find it, and will eventually abandon it, and look for a new place to nest. It is humorous to watch.

cuedude
 
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Old 05-31-05, 07:37 PM
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Carpenter bees tunnel into wood where they lay eggs. The don't eat the wood, they excavate it. Sawdust can often be found beneath holes. Because tunnel network can be quite extensive, you will need to puff insecticide dust into carpenter bee holes. A few days later, you can plug the holes.
 
 

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