Bees!


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Old 08-27-13, 12:04 PM
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Bees!

So I have been finding little holes around the house that apparently bees have nested in.
I think the old owner knew these pests were seasonal and just left them to their devices so they are just comfortable nesting anywhere.

Anyway, I have been spraying poison in the holes and filling them as I go BUT now with this last hole it seems either
a) some got in the house because it was a wire hole that actually was fully through the side I didnt know about
or
b) there is some entry into the house I cant find.
I tried going into the area with a 2x4 around the cinderblock foundation (where i thought they may be nesting between the blocks) and tapping but hear nothing and get no reaction.
Ive tapped around some wood areas and still hear/see nothing.

I keep seeing them on the window so Im wondering if theyre trapped inside and trying to get out to the nest or just looking to be near a light source.

Weird thing is many are dying/dead and they are super NON aggressive. even when i was srpaying the hole they would come out and fly around me but not sting. even now they just arent aggressive at all. I honestly feel bad killing the little buggers, I really like bees as well but cant have them int he house.

I am going to monitor the situation but any tips would be benficial.

These are really small almost resembling yellow jackets but fuzzy. They dont look like anything, and I thought maybe honeybees but cant be sure.

would bombing the lower level help? Should I lift the ledges over the cinderblocks and check even though I dont hear or see anything?
Do we think while I was spraying a few got in and I didnt notice?

thanks again
 
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Old 08-27-13, 01:42 PM
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They are carpenter bees, also called borer bees. The eat the wood and lay eggs. I kill them every chance I get! I've found using a duster to shoot sevin dust in the hole to be the most effective. The bees are programed to return to their place of birth to lay eggs so it pays to stay after them.
 
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Old 08-27-13, 03:17 PM
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Expanding on that--I've been looking for one of those small hand-crank Sevin dusters but so far nobody has one. Have they been banned or do I need to check a farm supply (I figured it was more a household size tool...)
 
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Old 08-28-13, 04:21 AM
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Are the holes in the block, the wood, or what?

They are on the window for the light source. Once they get inside they are confused and can’t get out the way they came in. That indicates a nest in a wall void or similar. Maybe a ceiling space.

Don’t fill in any more holes until the nest is found/treated thoroughly otherwise it could backfire on you.

One bee now and then could be an accidental invader; multiple bees at the same time mean a nest that has openings on exterior and now interior.

Re-treat the holes that you were treating when you found dead/dying bees and see what you find.

On a bright, sunny day take a slow walk around the outside looking a walls, roof, dormers, soffits, etc for activity.
 
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Old 08-28-13, 05:17 AM
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I know they are def not carpenter bees, they are way to small.

I have been looking but cant seem to find their source.
The ones I see are mostly slow and/or dying. I have been tapping all drop tiles, walls, and cinderblocks trying to hear for anything. When I built the ledges in the rear rooms (cinderblock toppers) I made them removable since there are wires in there.

I guess Ill have to pull them and see if there are anything in there. I know they are not in the wood wall voids about that since I just had that all tore open to replace the insulation and sheetrock.

This is perplexing. They have to be somewhere between the two windows which would be under our center stair case (raised ranch) but I was under there banging around and only saw one bees that was already out and about. Smushed her and kept banging the walls and woods but NOTHING came out. The hole was actually under the stairs.

Do you think bombing under the stairs would be beneficial or would that make the scatter and just invade the rest of the house?
 
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Old 08-28-13, 02:19 PM
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“Bombing” such as with total-release aerosols will be useless in this case. That would only affect exposed bees. When you find the nest, you treat the nest directly.

They may be living in a cement block void space; it’s common.

Follow my previous posts advice; especially about monitoring the exterior on a sunny day.
 
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Old 08-29-13, 05:53 AM
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I have been monitoring the exterior but havent seen one bee since i spray foamed the hole.
In the past I just sprayed poison and filled with no issues.
This time I guess I should have waited.
I may have found an area where the hive may be between two sills.

I am going to try and spray some poinson in there and at least see if they come out. So wierd, wish I could at least know what they are. They look like pics of african honeybees but again these things are tame. I mean I can actually pick them up without them even trying to sting me.

Will they eventually just starve if they cant get back outside?
 
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Old 08-29-13, 02:12 PM
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Could they be “European Hornets”? a very passive type of hornet but look fierce.

Are you still finding new ones inside your place?
 
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Old 08-30-13, 05:23 AM
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You know those might be it.

I found only 3 yesterday very late in the day.

Maybe theyre dying off but I will probably still pull the ledge up.
Actually there is an area where I could probably just lay a fogger on its side and point it into the ledge fine. At least this way it might spook them out if they are in there so I know where they are coming from.

I can -put one under the stairs an one under the ledge.
I could just buy some demon dust and pump it everywhere.

Honestly If I could just leave the window open and have them just leave I would. I really hate killing bees but then they would just find food and return getting bigger.
 
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Old 09-01-13, 08:19 PM
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Don't kill the bees!

I am an amateur beekeeper. Sorry for the late knput, but just saw this discussion. Based on the brief description, these could be honeybees, which are known to create hives inside cavities of houses, particularly older homes. Honeybees are critically important to our food supply but have been dying off at alarming rates in recent years. The cover story on the August 19 issue of Time magazine, "A World Without Bees, The price we'll pay if we don't figure out what's killing the honeybee", is a good summary of their importance and the problem.

I recommend that you try to contact amateur or commercial beekeepers in your area. Google it or try a listing on Craigslist. Because so many bees are dying, often these folks will remove the bees at no cost to you, simply because they are happy to add the bees to their hives.
 
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Old 09-01-13, 09:16 PM
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Our Bee Armageddon!

Over four years time we welcomed honey bees to a place under our siding. We thought it was the right thing but this year disaster struck. After doing the same as we finally called in a bee keeper to retrieve the queen and so forth. Minutes into his task he discovered Africanized bees were mixed in with the docile European bees. He immediately quit and told me to contact a bee extrmination firm. Long story short, the few bees we saw turned out to be 50,000 bees that were living year round in between the floors of our two story home. We hired this specialty company to rid us of the bees and clean up the 50 lbs of poisoned hive and honey. Aside from the bee mess we had to replace a section of the siding.

I strongly suggest you contact a firm that deals with invasive bees.
Good luck.
 

Last edited by Shadeladie; 09-03-13 at 07:30 AM.
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Old 09-02-13, 09:45 AM
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bee problems

It's too late to say this in this case, but for future reference or other readers who may have similar situations, the most important thing to do is First determine what the insect is. If you think they may be honey bees, track down a local beekeeper and have them check. I've had numerous calls to look at bees in the side of a house or tree, and when I arrived and got close, I could smell raid or some other kind of spray, and upon asking, the homeowner says "yeah, I tried spraying them. I have no use for bees and honey that has been contaminated, and it's a shame. If you just kill honeybees in a wall, you are leaving behind brood which will rot and many pounds of honey which will cause other problems.

Some tips: If your afraid to get too close or the bees (or wasps) seem aggressive, use a camera on zoom to get a good picture, or a pair of binoculars to look at them. Honey bees are small and do look fuzzy because of the hairs on their bodies.
If you have honeybees, you can most likely see them coming in with pollen on their legs if it's available. they aren't usually aggressive. Africanized honey bees can be an exception, and you should call in an expert.
Yellow jackets are also small, but smooth and shiny.
Bumblebees are bigger and fatter looking, also mostly fuzzy. Their nests consist of up to about 200 bees and they will be gone at the end of the season, since all die but next years queens, which will leave and burrow into the ground to hibernate.
Carpenter bees can be mistaken for bumble bees, but thorax is black and smooth, and they bore perfectly round holes about 3/8" diameter in bare wood. They will "divebomb" you if you are in their nesting area, but you don't have to worry about getting stung. Painting will discourage them from nesting in your house.
Hornets and yellow jackets are a different story altogether, but if they aren't in a high traffic area or stinging people, I usually let them be.
All insects have a value in the grand scheme of things, although I could do without slugs and fruit flies.

The main thing is to find out what you have, then decide how to deal with it.
 
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Old 09-02-13, 12:51 PM
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Excellent information for every homeowner. Thanks birkshirebee.
 
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Old 09-03-13, 06:50 AM
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well I have already sprayed poison in the hole so I doubt a bee keeper will want these. Plus there is no way to get at any nest since its hidden somewhere I cant find. Im only seeinf one or 2 a day now. Im sorry but I have to kill them before they damage anything further or nest elsewhere in the home and get uncontrollable. I dont want to but have to.
I dont think they are honeybees but i can take a pic of one and put it up if any appear today. I actually found one in my damn Kitchen last night so they are trying harder to get out.
Also many of the ones I have been finding dont seem to be able to fly. They can flutter their wings but just walk around. I put one outside yesterday but it just fluttered on the ground and couldnt fly. I wanted to see if it would try to fly int he direction of the nest but no go.

I am going to have to try to spray under the stairs in the area they seem to be coming out of, before this gets bad. I have people who are allergic to stings that come over and thought they are not aggresive (IE I picked one up and carried it outside) I cant risk being sued.
 
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Old 09-03-13, 07:12 AM
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I am sorry to say the only 100% effective method is to hire a professional bee exterminating company. It is most important to realize with your spraying you are killing only a few bees. The exterminator will locate the hive(s), kill all the bees then clean out dead bees, hive(s), honey and other mess. Believe me when I tell you that I tried every tactic you have mentioned before seeking pro help. In the end, exterminating the bess and having it all cleaned up was THE only answer. If the dead bees, hive, honey and so forth stays in your wall over time it will ferment, rot and become a feasting place for multitudes of terrible bugs and insects. I speak from first hand experience.
 
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Old 09-05-13, 03:52 AM
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Just curious. What did you wind up doming tvil?
 
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Old 09-05-13, 05:05 AM
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honestly So far Im only seeing like 1 a day now. I think they are basically starving out. I saw 2 now (one a day) upstairs but again they seem like they have ZERO energy, cant fly and dont try to defend/attack.

I do not think this is/was a big hive but just a starter since when I originally sprayed the hole only like 6 to 10 bees came out to try to chase me away. I think the ones I see now might be new hatchlings that are trying to escape.

I will keep monitoring, I want to try and spray some poison under the stair area in between the sills they might be but again I CANT find where they are coming from and can only assume because of where I found them originally.
 
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Old 09-05-13, 05:21 AM
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Re-treat the opening from where the 6-10 bees came out when treating. That is your avenue into the nest. Re-open the hole if you already patched it and treat it periodically until no activity noted over a week or so.
 
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Old 09-09-13, 05:52 AM
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havent seen a bee in about 3 or 4 days. think its worth opening an old wound at this point?
 
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Old 09-09-13, 01:37 PM
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Nope-leave it alone unless a compelling reason dictates otherwise. I’m confident that you got them..
 
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Old 09-12-13, 11:01 AM
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I had a carpenter bee infestation I just had to take care of so have advice to lend, assuming this is what the problem is.

Their lfie cycle starts in late March or early May. this is when you see them around your wood structures, with a male standing guard while the female tunnels in and lays about 5 or 6 eggs per hole. The adults you see doing the nexting die off over the next several weeks. Activity typically dies down once the eggs are laid until late summer or early fall. This is when they hatch, and the babies come out to feed briefly before going back into the nest to hybernate over the winter. Next march this is the next generation that will come out and drill new nests.

It is easy to be fooled into thinking the problem has solved itself at times because at a couple different points in the life cycle activity briefly dies down to zero. Usually adults need to leave the next and go feed on pollen and nectar during the day, then return to the nest in the evenings. The ones that look like they are trapped may be unable to find their way out of the house to a food source.

I did not feel like ordering an insecticide dispenser over the internet. Instead I ordered a handheld battery tester from an autoparts store, which is pretty much the same design, then modified it a bit to work for my purpose. I filled it with seven dust from home depot and puffed it into carpenter bee hole I could find a few months ago. The dust sits on top of the wood rather than soaking in so they will always pick enough of it up to kill them. But before that they will track it into the nest and it will get mixed in with the food for the larvae. I started finding dead adults on the ground all through June. Then activity died down for awhile. Then I went back to check again and all the babies hatched and died in the tunnels, so each hole had several dead bees jammed right inside the opening.

The best strategy for carpenter bees is a repellent liquid spray all over exterior wood structures and dust in the holes. This is how you ensure you will get the current generation and that the babies will all be immediately killed when they hatch. The more of the holes you can dust, the higher your chances of success. Killing them one at a time does very little good. I personally would not patch the holes until late fall when they are all dead. If any of them miss the poison they will tunnel out through your patch or make a new hole right next to your patch. You want the hole to stay open with dust in it until you get them all, then you can fill it. Most guides on the internet say to wait a couple weeks but waiting the summer out is better.
 
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Old 09-12-13, 01:18 PM
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Good advice ehari3; You can also purchase and use an aerosol can that has dust in it; it applies kinda like white spray paint. It is called “Tri-Die”. It has pyrethrins and silica dust in it. In some holes and openings it is easier to use an aero than a bulb duster, especially when one is afraid to go even one step higher on the ladder!

I like the battery bulb idea; I’m going to remember that, tks for the post.
 
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Old 09-13-13, 06:13 AM
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they are def not carpenter bees. thanks though, I am starting to think they were honey bees, which does make me feel bad. the hole they were in was a preexisting one from the old owner because he was a MAJOR reeny.
So far no more bees but I check every day.
thanks
 
 

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