Are window air conditioners completely sealed in/outside?


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Old 12-16-14, 07:47 AM
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Are window air conditioners completely sealed in/outside?

I get all sorts of bugs, hornets, etc in my window unit and am wondering if they are really totally sealed so outside stuff can't get in? I remember older units had had a damper that could be opened to let some fresh air mix with the inside air but none of my current units have this.
I do find the occasional bug or bee inside but they could be coming in other places...
 
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Old 12-16-14, 07:54 AM
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Units I have seen are not "sealed" but just have a tar-covered cardboard or styrofoam divider.

If they have a removable chassis inside a sleeve they generally have soft foam "rubber" around the outside to more-or-less seal the two sides. This foam rubber is easily damaged when removing or replacing the chassis.
 
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Old 12-16-14, 08:40 AM
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I can see light through mine but I use an unvented gas heater so I see it as a safety plus. They use to, and I guess still do, make winter covers to go on the outside. I've seen those home shows suggest they should be removed in the winter but that seems strange and foreign to someone who grew up in the south. (Crazy Yankees even dig a hole in the ground and build their house on top of it.)
 
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Old 12-16-14, 09:17 AM
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(Crazy Yankees even dig a hole in the ground and build their house on top of it. )

I grew up in a home that had a basement although the two homes I have owned have only had a crawl space. I REALLY wish I had a basement as it would make so many things in my life easier.

Crazy Texans put all their plumbing in the ground and then pour a layer of concrete over it. Then to add insult to injury they put their water heaters in the attic.
 
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Old 12-16-14, 09:39 AM
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Not in my part of Texas. The pipes are in the attic with that dang water heater. Not insulated so on the occasional below 25 for four hour night... well you get the picture. Want real fun? Just change out one of those water heaters.
 
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Old 12-16-14, 09:57 AM
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I think that the greatest chance for insect infiltration would be where the shell of the unit meets with the top, bottom and sides of window rather than through the unit itself.
 
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Old 12-16-14, 10:28 AM
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Originally Posted by PAbugman

I think that the greatest chance for insect infiltration would be where the shell of the unit meets with the top, bottom and sides of window rather than through the unit itself.
I have one in the master BR upstairs (farthest from furnace so it's often too warm in the summer) and it fits the single-width window close enough that I stuff foam pipe around it in the window channel. Still--they are vinyl replacement windows and the frames are mostly hollow so I know motivated bugs can find a way through the channels and end up inside. I'm sure I get a few lady beetles that way--what else have they got to do but spend the day trying to circumvent my barriers? ;-)
 
 

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