How long do fleas hang around for without a host?

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Old 11-17-19, 08:29 PM
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Unhappy How long do fleas hang around for without a host?

After a situation we now have fleas. There are NO hosts in the home that they can live off of now, except of course the humans living here lol. They are literally everywhere within the home! Upstairs, main floor and basement. I read somewhere that they'll all be dead within 3 months of their being no host... is this true? What steps do I need to take to start getting rid of them? What harm can come to the children with fleas being around? I don't know anything about fleas so all advice is needed and appreciated!! Thank you.
 
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Old 11-18-19, 05:01 AM
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Google this I had fleas on my cats many years ago and within 2 weeks of using this fleas were gone. I used a flour sifter to spread and brushed it in. Vacuumed it up after about 2 weeks and never had a problem. vI just used the cheapest one.
SponsoredSee damatiom earth for fleas
 
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Old 11-18-19, 05:30 AM
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Yes, there are hosts for the fleas... humans. I would spray inside the home with Talstar (bifenthrin) and an insect growth regulator (IGR).
 
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Old 11-18-19, 08:40 PM
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Well according to google fleas cannot survive on just humans. Plz does anyone have scientific studies?

And thank you on the DE suggestion, I will buy some this week!!!
 
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Old 11-19-19, 05:44 AM
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There are scientific studies. All you have to do is read them.

What species fleas you have? There are many species. Human fleas (Pulex irritans) can have a complete life cycle off humans. Most other species need other animals for a complete cycle but they still feed on humans.

Ever hear of the Black Plague? 75-200 million people killed by flea borne disease. The fleas lived primarily off rats but they still fed off humans passing along the disease.
 
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Old 11-19-19, 10:02 AM
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Fleas have 4 stages: egg, larvae (worm like), pupae (cocoon), adult.

The pupae stage can remained unhatched for up to 9 months while waiting for a host to walk by. Feeling the vibrations are a large trigger in the adult emergence.
Humans are not the preferred host and may not be suitable for continuing the life cycles long term, but humans are in fact a host and waiting them out without a control plan in place is not a good strategy.

I'm assuming the animals responsible for the fleas are no longer present? In any case, vacuuming will pick up eggs, pupae. The tricky part is you have to vacuum in the difficult areas, such as under neath beds, furniture cushions, the furniture itself, closet floors, underneath throw rugs, etc. The dark places are where you need to focus. Sleeper couches, futons and the like are notoriously hard to vacuum. Be diligent and patient.

This is a popular insecticide among pest control operators today. There are other good flea insecticides, just offering this one as a popular one.

https://www.domyown.com/pt-alpine-fl...ol-p-1886.html
 
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Old 11-20-19, 04:28 PM
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Ok and where are these studies? I hate when ppl give no details. Links would be nice or tell me what keywords to type in the search bar. Google otherwise is of no help.

As for species I'm pretty sure it would either be the dog or cat flea. My cats brought them in. I assume the only ay to know is to catch one and test it or something??

@bugman
Thank you! And that's right the hosts are no longer here. I've been debating on spreading DE everywhere at this point. Ugh these *******s are just as bad as bed bugs.....
 
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Old 11-21-19, 06:02 AM
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II'm not big on DE for much, especially as a broadcast treatment. Makes a visible mess at the least. Use modern day flea treatments that utilize a growth regulator such as the modern flea aerosols that you hold upside down as you back out of a room while spraying. Don't use total release aerosols, oftentimes called "bombs" as all they do is kill off a few exposed adults. The spray needs to be applied where the larvae live and that can be hard, time consuming work. Get someone to help you move furniture, lift cushions, etc. I described this in previous post to some extent.

Do a search for "fleas" and find the university sites as they will be objective and not trying to sell products/service. I found 8 universities on the first 3 pages of search results. Have to sort through the sales stuff, though much of it is still informative.
 
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Old 11-21-19, 03:56 PM
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Thanks!! Ok so I was able to catch a flea and it's black/brown. What type is it? And the spray I assume can be applied everywhere? Hopefully it's safe after a while... there are children within the home.
 
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Old 11-22-19, 07:07 AM
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In all likelihood it is either a "dog flea: or "cat flea". Those are the most common specie of flea. As far as treatment/harborage/nourishment go, they are pretty much the same.

The physical differences between the two would require magnification and a person who is pretty much an entomologist. Even a close up photo with a phone won't allow for the detail needed.

Treatment wise, carefully read the label/instructions of the product that you choose. Actually, you'll need to read the labels of various products in order to make a choice that fits your house/family situation. These are all residual insecticides that leave an insecticide on treated surfaces for days/weeks/months so keep that in mind. Never treat "everywhere". Learn where and how to treat by reading the label/instructions of various flea insecticides. Flea treatments require physical work and having a helper to move cushions, open sleeper couches, lift/tip furniture, life throw rugs, etc will prove valuable. Treat all "dark" spaces as that's where the larvae go to in order to pupate. Basically, the treatments will kill adults and larvae, with the focus being on stopping the life cycle at the larval stage. You could see fleas to some extent for 3 weeks after initial treatment. Hatching/emergence should be pretty much over by then unless re-infestation is occurring. Flea treatments require patience, thoroughness, and physical work to be successful.

The link I attached earlier will take you to various flea insecticides, labels, safety data sheets. The labels/safety data sheets will be the same no matter where you buy the product. Read my previous comments for info.
 
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