Bees! Need to Get Rid of Them!

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Old 11-19-19, 11:48 AM
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Bees! Need to Get Rid of Them!

Good afternoon,

We have a serious bee problem. For the past few months, they have been invading the upstairs area of our building. We've sprayed several time indoors and there have been what seems to be hundreds of dead bees that we've cleaned up. We've had a well known pest control company come and inspect, and they seem to believe that there is a hive on the outside, and they are somehow finding their way inside. We sprayed by a window and a whole host of them were dead on the floor by the window. There are no apparent open areas by the window, and we cannot see where they are coming from!

Outside of the window, there are wild vines growing that we don't have access to because it's on the property behind our building. As of today, we cannot gain access to that yard.

Is there nothing that we can do unless we find the hive? All spraying does is kill those who come inside, but they keep coming. Is there any thing that can be done to discourage them from moving in, pack up the hive, and move somewhere else? I know environmentally, we all want to save the bees. So do I, but not inside our building. Please advise. The ladies are freaking out!

BTW, there was a little reprieve because the weather got cold. It seems like they have come back because it's much warmer today.
 

Last edited by bper123; 11-19-19 at 11:57 AM. Reason: Additional Info
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Old 11-19-19, 12:28 PM
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In cold weather most bees slowdown and are less active. So, the frequency of seeing bees should be reduced substantially unless the cold weather isn't impacting them. Given this is mid-November and you're on Long Island, I suspect the bees are inside your building. I'd start by figuring out how they to the interior of your building then work back from there.
 
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Old 11-19-19, 01:11 PM
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I am assuming your talking about honey bees. Google "Bee Keepers" &/or "Bee removal" in your area. They'll usually be happy to come get them. Bee Keepers raise bees & may come get them for free or a small charge. Pest control or bee removal companies may / will probably charge you a fee to remove them.

If that yields no results, look for pest control companies in your area. They will come remove them or will probably be able to refer you to someone/company.

You'll never get them all trying to spray here & there.
 
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Old 11-19-19, 01:43 PM
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If you close off interior doors do you only see them, alive or dead, in one area. That will start to isolate their location or entrance point.

Describe your house, attic and basement? two story? and maybe some pictures from outside?

Bud
 
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Old 11-19-19, 03:04 PM
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As of today, we cannot gain access to that yard.
Is that because they won't allow you? If that's true you can get a court order and police on site to gain access to solve a problem that can only be done from their side.

Also the comment that the bee hive is outside seems strange. Usually it's the opposite case that the bees/wasp/whatever, will gain access to the inside, build a nest in the wall because it gives great protection from weather and enemies. Why do they feel the hive is outside? And why would the bees have need to come inside if the hive is already established outside?
 
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Old 11-19-19, 03:06 PM
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I was told that they are bumble bees. The building is a two story not for profit commercial building. The bees are concentrated in two adjacent rooms, both of which have windows. There are a lot of dead ones beneath one set of windows. It seems as if they are trying to get out of the other windows. The 'entry'window (not sure if they are actually coming in from there, but I believe so, is covered with growth (vines, leaves), and the other windows in the other room are bright and clear.
 
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Old 11-19-19, 03:14 PM
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Are the window frames new or old? In other words are they well sealed with no openings. Well caulked, and the adjoining brick work in good shape? The mortar sound and not in need of re-pointing? I still think the hive is inside.
 
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Old 11-19-19, 03:22 PM
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If you use some of the plastic window cover available for energy improvement and cover all the way to the outside of the window trim then, if they are coming through that window you will know it. if not it eliminates concern about the outside.

Bud

Note, wrapping paper and painters tape can accomplish the same thing, just darker.
 
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Old 11-20-19, 07:57 AM
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Bumblebees, assuming the ID is correct, will live in wall voids as well as the more typical harborage sites. Honeybees and yellow jackets also are common wall void nesters. I'm sure that the nest is in the wall voids. They never make free standing exterior nests like wasps/hornets do.

I've seen wall void nesting bees chew through the dry wall to enter the interior rooms and actually leave a flap of dry wall paper that closes behind them. I suspect this is simply due to how they chew through as opposed to a grand plan of theirs. The flap of paper makes it very hard to see.

In the room where you suspect they are entering, take you hand and slowly swipe over the walls and ceiling looking for soft spots,, cracks, depressions, etc. If you find their entry, that would also be a good place to inject insecticide to kill them. There may not be many more though as they die off this time of year anyway, except for the queens that will leave and mate/nest next year. If you find the entry, duct tape would work temporarily.
 
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