bats in trusses

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  #1  
Old 06-27-20, 09:40 AM
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bats in trusses

My house has trusses. 2 vents on one side. I hear sounds and I am 80% sure they are bats, I see them at night too flying around. They make a squeaking/rubbing sound in the truss under the siding....
nasty.... instead of enlarging the vent openings and crawling in there.... I was wondering if I could use
some sonic type assault on them to leave... some kind of sound generator that makes a sound they cant stand...
I could leave it on up in that area for a few days....is there anything like that out there???
I know bats are sensitive to some sounds because it screws up there navigation sonar...
 
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Old 06-27-20, 11:29 AM
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I've read what you wrote twice.
Where are they getting in ?
Are the vents compromised ?
 
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Old 06-27-20, 01:10 PM
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What ever you do be kind to the bats, they are very beneficial to your area, eat tons of bugs and they just want a nice place to roost.

Hire a company to come out, and get them out unharmed then find where they are coming in and seal that up!
 
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Old 06-27-20, 03:21 PM
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In my area, bats are a 'protected' species. That being said, they can cause serious health issues in a house. The best way to get rid of them is to locate exactly where they are getting in and out. Go around and seal ALL other openings you see, no matter how small. At their entry/exit point, attach a four foot long section of dryer vent flex hose, letting it hang down, sealing the it at the attachment point. Leave it on for a week or two and the problem will be solved. The bats will be able to leave, dropping down the hose, but should not be able to fly up it. They will find someplace else to nest. When you're sure they've all left, remove the hose and seal that opening.
 
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Old 06-28-20, 03:28 AM
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A friend of mine used to have a house across the border in Va. and bats were protected there. The main reason they were able to get in his attic was his ill fitting tin roof. When he had it ripped off and replaced the bats left during the work and were unable to return once the new roof was finished.

Lights and noise are supposed to drive them out but you need to make sure everything gets sealed up so they can't return.
 
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Old 06-28-20, 08:29 AM
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I have no faith or knowledge that the sonic devices work to any extent for anything. Minimac's advice on a one-way or exclusion device is what the pro's oftentimes use.

It is very important to competently seal up all entry/exit points when they are gone as future bats will try to re-locate there as they can sense pheromones and such.
 
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Old 06-28-20, 08:36 AM
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5 years ago I had what seemed to be Hanta Virus. Deadly for some people but I fought it off without help.It was nasty. Breathing problems ,severe fatigue, it would come and go in waves. It really sucked. I spent 2500$
on tests but nothing found. They didnt do a Hanta test because they rarely do. My state is back ass wards and way behind in medical stuff. Hanta is around here though. Just not a lot. Like all viruses it is thought to come from bats.
It presents almost identical to Covid 19. I figured I got immunity to hanta from having it to some degree and probably Covid also because they are related to some degree. Maybe I should thank the bats for screwing me up.
" Thank you bats....you might have helped me...but I want you out now...sorry"
 
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Old 06-28-20, 04:31 PM
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What a story Stan! Hope the bad things are all behind you now.

One more thing to be concerned about, not that you need it, is to not seal up until you know that the young bats are able to fly. Otherwise, if it's a large colony, there could be quite a mess and odor if the young ones are trapped inside. I don't know enough about their life cycle to know the timing, but the local county agricultural extension agent or wildlife biologist would know that better. The timing will change from region to region, climate to climate, which is why local info will be more accurate.
 
 

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