When to close up wasp hole

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Old 08-10-20, 07:31 AM
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When to close up wasp hole

I removed a paperwasp nest from the interior of my soffit. They gained access thru a hole in the fascia.

I initially treated the nest with deltametherin dust, the next morning I opened up the soffit and saw it was still quite active. I physically removed the nest and then treated the entry way and soffit with dust again.

When should I seal up the entry hole in the fascia board?

I know stragglers will be coming and going, Im afraid if they dont try to rebuild at the entry point again they may go deeper into the atticspace.

 
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Old 08-10-20, 07:36 AM
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Do it now, it's not anything that really needs to be removed, assuming that is the only entry point when sealed they will just die off!

The dust takes a little time!
 
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Old 08-10-20, 07:38 AM
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So im thinking if I seal it now and there is another untreated nest in a another soffit section I didnt see, then they will be trapped and come into attic or worse.

If I dont seal it now, then stragglers will still be coming and going.

 
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Old 08-10-20, 10:47 AM
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After removing the nest completely, cleaning the surface it was on and applying dust to the interior of the soffit I went ahead and sealed the hole with some flashing. Theres still some wasps flying around looking to get into the soffit.

The nest I removed was an inch away from the opening I sealed, if wasps from a different nest was using that entry way as well, then they would have to literally come in contact with the other nest and wasps. So if there is another nest in another soffit compartment, then I am guess there would be another hole instead.



 
  #5  
Old 08-10-20, 02:47 PM
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I think you did fine. For the most part, the nests that you don't want to seal up until absolutely positive, are yellow jackets and honey bees. Even then, if the nest is large, you may have to remove the nest anyway as the organic material will rot and smell badly. In the case of honey bees it would attract more honey bees next season. Usually large nest removal requires more serious ripping and tearing.

Deltamethrin dust (Delta Dust?) is not my first choice for bees/wasps/hornets as it is not water soluble meaning that it doesn't dissolve at all. Making direct contact is necessary in this case. Non water solubility is desirable when treating wall voids, etc in commercial and industrial areas and chronically damp areas. I preferred Tempo Dust as it is still a synthetic pyrethrin, but it will dissolve a little bit when it is on nesting material as it is slightly damp. I always had both types of dust with me and still do in retirement.

Take a small amount of delta dust in a jar and mix it with water. If it is the Delta Dust that I'm referring to, it won't mix/dissolve. You should be able to pour out the water and dust and physically blow the dust away. That is very desirable in some situations, but not in others.
 
 

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