Long Term Wasp Repelent

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Old 11-08-20, 07:25 AM
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Long Term Wasp Repelent

Task at hand this fall, got to get into the soffit in one area of the house where wasps have a nest.

Have attempted to spray on a couple occasions but it was not totally successful, last year I was able to peek into the area and saw a pretty good size nest and no there is no way to seal the area.

Other than dusting the area with some type of powder insecticide anything else available, not really seeing much else on searches.
 
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Old 11-08-20, 08:55 AM
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Can soak you the nest with insecticide? I assume it's in fact wasp nest (those papery type). And will it kill the hive. If so, DON"T remove it. I had a reoccurring wasp nest being build on the outside of my cabin roof peak. Each time I remove it and by the following week it was back. Some old guy said don't remove it. So I left it and the remain are still there, but never a wasp again. Been 3 years now.
Now my bee hive inside the roof is a whole new ball game. Can't seem to get those bugger out.
 
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Old 11-08-20, 01:19 PM
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assume it's in fact wasp nest (those papery type).
It is, OMG, I had a nest in my shower vent hose a few years ago, it was disgusting, smelled like krap.

When I looked up there a couple years ago it was about size of football, leaving it will take great courage!

I will have to think about that one but I see the logic!
 
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Old 11-09-20, 06:20 AM
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Winter will solve the active wasp issue. Honeybees are the only bee, wasp, etc that overwinter as a colony. Once you're sure there is no activity, you can destroy it or leave it. No wasps will move into it next year. Honeybee nests can get re-occupied by other colonies after the first colony is removed. That's why it's important to remove and thoroughly clean the area where a honeybee nest was.

In wasp nests, only the queen survives the winter. In the spring she will leave, always does, and start a nest somewhere else. When there is no activity noted, it is safe to destroy/remove the nest if desired.
 
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Old 11-09-20, 06:46 AM
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Well this has been ongoing over the past 3 years in the same location so maybe its been 3 separate nests but they are all coming and going from the same general area.

 
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Old 11-09-20, 07:00 AM
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It may be an area conducive to wasps. How far away is the area? Could you spray the general area with a compressed air sprayer? If so, residual insecticides would be helpful especially if applied early enough. I'd say early/middle summer on into the fall. What, if anything, is below the area as with a compressed air sprayer you will be using water based spray that will run/drip. The water based sprays will give the best residual which I believe would be important in this situation. If you want to try that, I can come up with names of active ingredients.
 
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Old 11-09-20, 07:07 AM
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In wasp nests, only the queen survives the winter. In the spring she will leave, always does, and start a nest somewhere else
This is why I always swat every solitary wasp I see, especially in spring when they are nesting... knock out 1 wasp and you could be preventing 10 colonies.
 
 

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