How do I get rid of bees in hollow brick wall?


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Old 10-22-22, 08:10 AM
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How do I get rid of bees in hollow brick wall?

Hey guys, there are a few small holes in our garage's hollow concrete brick walls, how might I get rid of them please? I am wondering if sealing the holes with spackle or caulking will do?
 

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10-23-22, 07:38 AM
Tony P.
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Seeing your picture, I'd use something like this to fill the space:

 
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Old 10-22-22, 01:10 PM
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Caulk works well for sealing small (1/4-1/2) holes in block. Clean well with water and allow to dry before applying the caulk. If you have bees (more likely wasps) nesting in them, you can use insecticide dust applied with a bulb duster to kill them. I suppose just sealing the holes might kill them, it might also drive them into any other area they can get to traveling though the block cores.
 
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Old 10-23-22, 06:20 AM
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I wouldn't seal anything until I was convinced the bee/wasp/yellow jacket problem was solved. They will try to emerge elsewhere, which in a block garage, may not be that serious. In a residence, it could turn into a grade B horror movie at times.

Insecticide dust as Carbide suggested would work well if you have application equipment. Without that, I'd consider using an aerosol made for spraying a jet stream 10-20 feet, but I would apply it by getting the nozzle worked into or up against the entry/exit holes, wearing eye/face protection from potential splash, gloves, jacket, etc. Wrap a rag around the application area to absorb splashback and treat into each opening. At first, I'd give a short burst to see if the opening actually accepts the spray before giving it a 5-8 second burst. I'd locate the openings in the day time so I could find them at dusk when they will be in there.

The other aspect is to realize that winter will solve the problem, unless they are honeybees. Honeybees will overwinter as a colony and continue to get larger. Wasps, hornets, yellow jackets, bumble bees, etc will over winter only as a queen, and she will leave in the spring. It would be important to caulk/seal in the spring to prevent future infestation. Post pics or search internet if you need help with ID.

May take several days to gain full control and possible re-application.

 
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Old 10-23-22, 06:53 AM
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Thanks guys, I am thinking of getting this apparatus and simply spray into the holes which are large enough to accommodate the nozzle, good idea?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztHCP__Ea04

Will take pics later and post here.
 
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Old 10-23-22, 07:00 AM
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I agree with earlier commpents on eliminating bees (or wasps) from your space so I'm focusing on closing the space. If the holes appear to be left intentionally. it may be the they are needed for drainage and shouldn't be sealed. You may want to consider filling them with copper mesh. (I prefer copper over steel wool to eliminate the possibility of rust.) Mopper mesh is easy to find and easier to apply. It comes in rolls that can be cut with shears.
 
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Old 10-23-22, 07:07 AM
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This a pic of the 4 holes which I notice they are always entering/exiting:

https://i.postimg.cc/mZKf1Zmj/IMG-3897.jpg

So to clarify, should I use that dust spray or seal or both please?
 
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Old 10-23-22, 07:38 AM
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Seeing your picture, I'd use something like this to fill the space:

 
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Old 10-23-22, 07:50 AM
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I think it would be simpler to use aerosol with protection for splash back as earlier advised. The vapors from the aerosol in an enclosed space like that will move upward, down, sideways probably better than dust will. To me, these look like holes that could be sealed permanently, but let's hear others observations.

If you choose dust, don't use Delta dust or boric acid. Go Tempo D, Sevin, Cypermethrin dusts. Farm supply stores, hardware stores carry Sevin and Cypermethrin here in PA. Delta is too dry. I always wanted something that would dissolve slightly in and on a moist nest. Also, when using it in wall voids for wasps, hornets, etc. I'd fill at least half full and use it heavily. Turn it sideways or a little upside down to get a lot more out. The video correctly explains that a light coating is better because insects will avoid a heavier coating, but that pertains to typical crawling insects. Treating bee nests in voids is very different. They will go in and out regardless. Do this at dusk also.
 
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Old 10-24-22, 04:29 AM
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Ok so if using Aerosol before sealing, can I trouble you to pinpoint one of these or if not then recommend any one in particular please?

https://www.homedepot.com/s/bees%20insecticide?NCNI-5
 
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Old 10-24-22, 05:27 AM
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My choices are:
  • Spectracide HG-53371. It should get into the nest area well as it's an expanding foam and it has a short term residual effect (while it is wet) on any guys out of the nest when you spray. \
  • Spectracide Pro HG-310110-6. It will also get into the nesting area and has a longer term residual effect.
You should probably spray two or three times. To get the most insects spray early or late in the day. Wear gloves and be careful the spray doesn't blow back onto you.
 

Last edited by Tony P.; 10-24-22 at 05:43 AM.
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Old 10-24-22, 05:49 AM
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Ok thanks, will wear gloves and goggles and spray the Spectracide into all holes at dusk when they are not flying in and out 3 days in a row then will seal all holes with the concrete patch on the 4th day, that's the plan?
 
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Old 10-24-22, 08:46 AM
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Go with the 53371. That one has an applicator tip and it will have a good residual effect as it has lambda-cyhalothrin in it. Common ingredient used by pros in the compressed air sprayers for crawling insect control. I can't read the active ingredients in the other one Tony mentioned but they all will work as long as you can get the insecticide into the wall voids. Don't stand back and spray, that only works on well exposed nests. You have to get it into the voids.

Don't seal anything until there is no activity. Determine that by observing during a warm, sunny day. No urgency to seal the holes as the residual would kill anything re-entering. In any case, new nest building is over for this season.

I wouldn't re-treat until and unless I saw reason to. I was always curious to see if one application would do it; I felt it made me a better applicator to judge my results as opposed to automatically re-treating. Now that said, it isn't unusual to have to re-treat, but I like to wait and see. I would re-treat right before sealing, as least to a small extent. It's your call, really. No textbook answers to this; it's the applicators/DIY'ers decision at this point.
 
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Old 11-22-22, 06:43 AM
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Hey guys, sorry, forgot to post back here. About 2 weeks after the last post here when I was intending to go to HD to get eh Spectracide I started seeing less bees all of a sudden and 2 weeks after that none at all since then.

Does this mean they left due to the change in weather and won't come back or should I now seal all visible holes with the concrete patch please?
 
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Old 11-22-22, 08:23 AM
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Very possible that winter solved this. Re-read my post of 10/23/22. Unless they are honeybees, you should be all right. I'd be comfortable sealing the openings now or in the spring.
 
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Old 11-22-22, 08:30 AM
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Thanks a million, will do!
 
 

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