Moths in lawn


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Old 08-14-23, 12:22 PM
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Moths in lawn

Why do I have so many small white moths in my lawn (and how do I get rid of them)?

Not really sure if this is a pest control or lawn-related issue, but I've noticed more and more lately (and way more so than past years) that whenever I take my dog out for her last potty (around 9:30 PM) there are always a dozen (noticeable) or so white moths landing/rising from the grass (and getting in our faces sometimes). They aren't even hovering around the lights that come on, they are simply on/around the grass.

Thank you.
 
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Old 08-14-23, 01:26 PM
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Old 08-14-23, 01:32 PM
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Thank you, and sorry that I didn't just google it. Seems like the reason they are mostly in the area where our dog goes is that I tend to not put down many chemicals (insecticide...) in that area...
 
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Old 08-15-23, 06:24 AM
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Do you know if something like this actually works well:

https://www.domyown.com/spinosad-lan...ts-p-1718.html

Or should I go with bifenthrin granules?

I want to keep it as safe as possible for the dog.
 
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Old 08-15-23, 08:29 AM
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As stated in the article. The accepted treatment is to do nothing in most cases. It is generally not a harmful insect. The only problem is you don't like seeing them when you go outside at that time of day.
 
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Old 08-15-23, 08:49 AM
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Ok thanks. I'm starting to notice some dead patches so figured it's getting kind of bad, but I guess I can wait and see if the issues persists next year.

Thank you again.
 
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Old 08-15-23, 11:09 AM
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Hopefully our resident expert will be along to offer some better advice. I very, very rarely do lawn pesticides so I don't have a lot of recent experience.

I have never used a product containing Spinosad but I have used Bifenthrin (Talstar brand liquid) indoors and it is quite effective. I see from it's label that it is approved for athletic fields and turf grasses so it (Bifenthrin) could be an option especially in granular form so it's easy to apply.
 
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Old 08-16-23, 06:31 AM
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I Don't have much experience with lawn treatments though I've done them to an extent. Seemed to me it was a lot of insecticide over a broad area. Recently other and less toxic and impactful insecticides have come on the market, such as the one mentioned, Spinosad. It's in the category of "minimum risk" insecticides. Reminded me of the Neem oil that I use on our vegetable plants as needed. The bifenthrin is a more traditional insecticide, synthetic pyrethroid, that is used a lot in the industry and by diy'ers. It is not a minimum risk, but is a lower toxicity than most. Given the choice, I personally would go with Spinosad for the lower risk to pets, non targets, and minimal runoff impact. Read and follow instructions. The minimum risk insecticides aren't as forgiving if an area is missed or under treated. Re-application can be more frequent. Price will likely be higher. Pay attention to the timing of the application. Sometimes the target pest needs to be treated at a certain time of year/life cycle for that particular insecticide. Be aware that these minimum risk, plant based sprays can have a heavy odor.
After reading about the moths, it does seem as though a healthy lawn can tolerate them to an extent, so it's not like you have to get anywhere near 100% control. Maybe partial area treatments will work; read the instructions as to that, if any. Pest control doesn't mean pest elimination in many cases.
The hose end sprayers are convenient, but it's harder to calibrate the amount being used. Using the proper amount can be very important when using minimum risk. Too little, and it may not work, which means it's been wasted anyway. Using concentrate from a bottle and mixed in a compressed air/backpack sprayer will give the operator much more control and efficiency in applying a given amount over a given area. Should be cheaper, too. That said, go with what you want the first time. You will gain experience right away and can then make choices based on that for future treatments, as needed.
 
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Old 08-16-23, 06:34 AM
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Thank you very much for the detailed follow-up. If anything I'll likely give the spinosad a try, though I might wait until next year to see if the issue persists/gets worse.
 
 

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