Wasps


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Old 03-23-24, 02:29 PM
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Wasps

Last year while weed whacking I disturbed a ground nest of what I believe were yellow jacket wasps. While I'm not sure exactly what variety they were I do know they were very aggressive exiting the underground hive in a swarm. I got stung 5 or 6 times before I could get away from them. I have been stung by bees and wasps many times. These stings were by far the most painful and long lasting (a week or more pain and itching) stings I have ever had. It was at the end of the mowing season so I let it slide. Now it's early spring and I want to kill them all! Over and over. They really pi$$ed me off. I am not nervous about bees, hornets or garden variety wasps but these guys are something else. I intend to call an exterminator.

My questions are do these guys survive winter in their ground nests and 2nd should I call the exterminator now while they are dormant or wait a few weeks until they are active - assuming they survived the winter.
 
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Old 03-23-24, 04:02 PM
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Hopefully PA Bugman will be along to answer your question.
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I feel your pain. Literally. I mowed over a nest 10 years ago. I was on the lawnmower so it's 7 or 8 mph top speed seemed glacial as I tried to clear the area.

As far as pain though. In Central America I learned to never stand still without thoroughly looking around my feet. The bullet ant's name is well earned.
 
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Old 03-23-24, 05:15 PM
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Oh yeah, they hurt. And unlike bees, they keep their stinger and will sting multiple times. A paste of adolfs meat tenderizer and a little water applied to the stings provides good relief quickly; I keep some in the house just for stings.
There are experts here, but my understanding is only the queen can survive freezing temperatures lasting more than a few days. I see you are in CT so if you're away from the coast and get a hard freeze so the ground freezes that should be the end of them. The queen will hibernate over winter, deep in the ground or other sheltered spot, and will emerge to start a new nest in a different location in spring.

I keep an eye out when mowing or trimming for any sign of them leaving/entering the ground; they love to nest in burrows, snake holes, any opening into the ground, at least around here.
 
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Old 03-23-24, 07:35 PM
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I have spent quite a bit of time in Panama and have visited Costa Rica a couple of times. I had never heard of a bullet ant. I had to Google them. After reading about them I'm glad I never met any first hand.
 
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Old 03-23-24, 08:00 PM
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I did the same thing a couple years ago and took seven hits while I was running away. I've broken bones and been in less pain....

After a couple weeks, I worked up the nerve to try to find the nest and was able to find it - a hole in the ground. I have some generic insect killer and I soaked that area one night and all has been since. I maybe could have use less of the product but I was mad and out for revenge. Haven't seen them again since.
 
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Old 03-23-24, 09:53 PM
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I had 5 or 5 nests last summer. They had made open holes around 6-8 inches across. I was surprised they never attacked me but still, they had to go. I poured some kerosene in the holes and burned them out. Worked fine.
 
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Old 03-24-24, 04:14 AM
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Like Sofasurfer, my two brothers & I were bush hogging down on the farm a few years back & run across a nest in the ground. Some of them got after my brother on the tractor. We took an oil can or something like that, cut the top out of it & one of us dumped the entire quart of diesel mixed with some gasoline in the hole and another pitched a burning stick to it. No more wasps.
 
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Old 03-24-24, 05:58 AM
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They were most likely yellow jackets and they don't over winter except for the queen. Only honeybees overwinter as a colony and continue to expand. Yellow jackets (and others) get more aggressive as it gets later into fall. Engines seem to make them even more aggressive. There's nothing there to treat at the moment, and there's nothing to do preventatively. Maybe in late summer it could be good to begin a slow walk and visual inspection on sunny days to look for activity. Now, if weed whacking, you're possibly working in overgrown and visually cluttered conditions and you won't see them until too late anyway. I wear thicker coveralls, gloves, etc even in hot weather. I've been told by people that are genuinely allergic to stings, that yellow jacket stings are the worse for them.
 
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Old 03-27-24, 12:15 PM
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For the past years, I was stung by bees many times, .... just last summer, a bunch of bees came after me when I attempted to weeds out of the flower garden(I have many, many flowers both flower-bushes and garden flowers in my front yard. Also, there are a thick, mid-sized flower trees(I forgot the name for, ...), so it must be a heaven for those bees making several nests.
As suggested from other poster(responder) last year, I purchased a bag of 'moth-ball' from Wal-mart, priced about $7.00 a bag. I put several pouches of 'mothball' inside the shed surrounded by bushes and plan to put more on the flower-garden and its vicinity. Also, I purchased a can of Bee-chaser at Amazon. There also are many different bee-killers, but do not work well, because of aggressiveness of so many bees(group of bees).
As for a relief after stung by bees, I purchased Bernadryl Gel, Beneadyl (itch cooling Spray), Medicaine (Sting & Bite Ampules) and Sting Relief Pads from Amazon which I've been keeping on the shelf just in case. For me, Medicaine is a best amongst the best Bee-sting). Luckily, I'm not allergic to any insect stings, including bees.
 

Last edited by PineCone; 03-27-24 at 12:26 PM.
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Old 03-27-24, 02:57 PM
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I don't kill bees. We welcome bees in our yard. Bees like honey bees, bumble bees, carpenter bees are not aggressive and usually won't sting. They are very good pollinators. I usually don't kill wasps but these aggressive wasps have got to go.

BTW If you are not allergic a normal bee sting lasts just a minute or so I usually just swear and bear it.
 
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Old 03-27-24, 05:15 PM
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I don't kill bees. We welcome bees in our yard. Bees like honey bees, bumble bees, carpenter bees are not aggressive and usually won't sting. They are very good pollinators. I usually don't kill wasps but these aggressive wasps have got to go.
I really don't know a different between bees and yellow jackets, but last Summer there was a group of bees, about five and six bees after me when I attempted to pull weeds out from the flower garden. A head of bees, I recall, 'yellowish' in color. Stung was so bad and it lasted about two weeks. First, swelling started several areas on my forearm, then pain along with itchiness was unbearable to not able to sound-sleep which I normally do. Probably, after all they were not an ordinary bees, it must be 'yellow jackets or wasps got on my forearm. Besides this incident, there are few more stings by one or two bees that was as bad as the previous one.
I needed to apply 'Mountain Sting-relief or similar name' for having it get a relief. It was a kind of nightmarish, but I still love flowers and several flower-trees planted years ago. So, I just be more careful around those areas.
Even inside the shed, there are few bees, but not aggressive. I still go in and out of the shed that is a big relief for me.
 
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Old 03-27-24, 07:02 PM
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I agree the insect that stung you was not a bee. It was a wasp, probably the same variety that I had a problem with last year. Very aggressive and a really painful, long lasting sting.

If you love your flowers bees are your friend.
 
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Old 03-28-24, 02:39 PM
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If you love your flowers bees are your friend.
I don't know Wasps are my real friend, .... rather call them 'Uninvited friends.'
As suggested by poster/responder on my previous thread, I purchased a box of Mothball at Wal-mart priced about $7.00. It's $10 at Lowe's. So, it's a fair price to get one more box when weather getting warmer in this region. Currently, it's more rainy days than sunny Spring due to Climate change.
Flowers, flower-trees and bushes are more likely my hobby, not eye-pleasure.
I'm guessing that a lot of folks willingly spend what they love even current economy is not stable to do that.
 
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Old 03-28-24, 03:55 PM
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Bees are not wasps. I always thought of wasps as secondary pollinators. Not worth putting up with the aggressiveness. Learn to recognize insects that are bees (the good guys) and the insects that are wasps (the bad guys). Do everything you can to attract bees. You flowers and gardens will love it.
 
 

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