Insulation for 200+ yr. old house

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  #1  
Old 09-16-02, 11:37 AM
vorheesfarm
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Insulation for 200+ yr. old house

I am about to embark on a multi-month project of taking cedar siding clapboard planks off, stripping off the paint, priming and painting, and then reinstall. The house is currently uninsulated except for the gable ends (brick insulation under the siding). The house has minimal water damage, termites and carpenter ants due to the fact that it is so drafty.

Should I add insulation between the studs and if I should, what kind. I am worried that adding insulation will create problems that haven't existed in 200 years.
 
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Old 09-18-02, 09:59 PM
rbisys
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Greetings,

If you install a radiant barrier (RB) insulation you will not have any condensation to atract ants and termites. RBs are about 95% efficient as compared to about 10% for bulk types. Since bulk type condensate moisture you would have more moisture contacting the siding. You would also have mold problems.

The type you want is a B3, a two layer material.

Thank you for considering my opinion.
 
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Old 09-19-02, 04:54 AM
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RB INSULATION

RBISYS: I have seen you pushing the RB insulation in several different posts. How is it installed and what R values does it impart? In exterior side walls is it flat against the siding or is it stapled to the studs under the drywall? In unheated attics how is it used?
 
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Old 09-19-02, 06:54 AM
rbisys
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Greetings,

PLEASE, don't say push. Sounds tacky. I have an image I have to maintain.

On exterior walls there are two methods. Perforated is used for exterior apps. There are paper, plastic and pure foil materials that come up to 51" wide. They are usually about 4 mil thick.

You can install directly over the sheathing,or I prefer to attach a 1/2" x 1 1/2" osb strip over the stud lines. This way I can tighten up the wall and I also have an air space between the wall and RB ant the siding and the RB.

We do not like to use R factors as that refers to resistance. RBs are reflective. However some building inspectors want the R FACTOR. O-C had their 1960's installed conditions test published by the NBS in 1970. In a 4", brick veneer wall under winter conditions their R 11 batt only got about a R 5.6. Because fiberglass and celulose are mostly air there is some serious questions about using R factors at all for these products. Going to R 38 in the ceilings is just as a industry scam to get you to buy more insulation and if you think DOE is honest in their recommendations, remember they The government. are in bed with the utility companies and the FG industry (DOCUMENTED).

For ceil'g, new construction I install a 3 layer material before the dry wall. It is stapled in.

For existing hmes I install a special 2 layer material( I make on site) over the existing insuation. I do not recommend installing RBs to the bottom of the rafters.

Generally speaking, I have found over the past 30 years that a RB insulated home will out perform anything else. hands down. PLUS, it will not kill you or make you sick or rot out the walls.
If the customer builds with the right window size and placement with the correct over hang and insulates as I recommend they will NOT have to use geo therm(ground loop) HVAC systems.

I also recommend RB paint ( Koolcoat.com ) to be used in areas where the regular RBs cannot be installed.

Samples available.

Thank you for considering my opinion.
 
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Old 09-19-02, 07:36 AM
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RBISYS - Thanks for the info. Is there a web site I may access for more information?
 
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Old 09-19-02, 12:07 PM
rbisys
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Greetings,

Go to google then enter radiant barriers.

You might also want to see the webs for FG illnesses, enter fiberglass information network and FG litigation.

Try fifoil.com

For RB paints koolcoat.com

Have fun.
 
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Old 09-21-02, 08:56 AM
USCINC
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Thumbs up

Originally posted by thiggy
RBISYS - Thanks for the info. Is there a web site I may access for more information?
Try www.uscinsulation.com anytime you are serious about insulation in the Ohio, Pa and Ny area. For other areas try www.betterinsulation.com.
Thanks
 
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Old 09-22-02, 11:25 AM
rbisys
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Greetings,

The RB shown in the better insulation site is a typical type 2 (single layer) material. It will work just fine. HOWEVER:

I developed a two layer material to install over the attic insul.
The reason for this is, in some areas you have a very high dust factor and some people seem very concerned about dust. By having a 2 layer perforated material you can paint the top layer flat black and you still have two unaffected surfaces. So you have permanent value. DOE has tried to discredit these perforated prods by saying that as the dust settles and you have moisture present, the dust will solidifiy and plug the holes. They do not provide any documentation so I figure it's the mud that's blocking their orificies that they are really talking about.

Thank you for the oppurtunity to sound off again about one of my favorite subjects, the DOE

Thank you for considering my opinion.
 
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