Blow in insulation around post & wire

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  #1  
Old 10-01-02, 04:04 PM
Joel2
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Blow in insulation around post & wire

Hello-
I'm looking at using a rented insulation blower and insulating a 1917 house with no wall insulation. My understanding was that this would be easier and harder to over-do, unlike using spray in polyurethane foams. My question is wether I need to worry about any fire hazard by installing insulation in the external walls, and if there's any other way that I could insulate my house without pulling a lot of the siding off.
Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 10-02-02, 06:42 AM
Zathrus
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Depends on the kind of wiring you have - if you have "modern" Romex/NM cable for electrical then it shouldn't be an issue - the boxes provide adequate protection between the wiring and the insulation.

If you have old electrical wiring (argh, the terminology is avoiding me now and my reference book is at home), then I honestly don't know the answer. Ask over in the Electrical forum perhaps - there's pros there who are familiar with old wiring.
 
  #3  
Old 10-02-02, 08:13 AM
Joel2
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Thanks. I'll go ask the electric folks.

So, is blow in insulation a good relativley inexpensive way to insulate exterior walls , and not have it turn into a huge project?
 
  #4  
Old 10-03-02, 05:48 AM
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Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: USA
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The type of electrical wiring you have is known as knob and tube. They are also known as isolators. As this term implies the knobs and tubes isolate the wiring from being touched. Blowing in insulation over and around this type of wiring is not advisable.

There are some contractors that will blow in insulation with this type of wiring present. My advice would be to change the wiring first before you insulate. If you insulate first and then decide to upgrade your electrical or have to, it is going to be a lot more difficult and expensive with the insulation present.

Knob and tube have not been used for decades. Though it may be a reliable system, it is not compatible with today's modern appliances.
 
  #5  
Old 10-03-02, 07:10 PM
Joel2
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yeah, it's not advisable, and apparently it's against code, says a person from the electrical forum. I'm gonna have to rethink my plans, and probably call a contractor and have them come out and give an estimate on it. Most of the walls in question are lacking in plugs and stuff, but I'm not going to just go off a hunch on something like this.
 
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