Blown in Insulation

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  #1  
Old 11-22-99, 03:34 PM
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We recently purchased a thirty year home. It does not have any insulation in the walls. We had thought about blowing the insulation into the walls. But, my husband is afraid that since the walls are dry wall that eventually in time, the cellulose insulation would settle and slightly bow the walls. Any suggestions?
 
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  #2  
Old 11-22-99, 03:36 PM
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I would not consider blown in insulation unless you have or are willing to install a vapor barrier between the insulation end the inside wall.Without a vapor barrier moisture will form end could cause lot of damage
 
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Old 11-22-99, 03:38 PM
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If your budget will support it, consider pumping in Icynene foam. It's airtight when cured and therefore acts as its own vapor barrier, will completely fill all the wall cavities and eliminate air infiltration, and won't bow your walls if it's put in properly.
 
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Old 11-22-99, 03:39 PM
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Another option is dense pack cellulose, done by someone who will assure that it is pumped in at at least 3.5 psf. This means not being able to push a finger in more than one knuckle. It does the same as Isconyne, at much less cost, though really search for someone who will do a true dense pack.
 
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Old 01-04-00, 06:01 PM
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Mar
if you place a flashlight against the wall in the dark you will find that it isn't as flat as it appears. Dense pack celulose will bow your drywall. insulation is caused by trapping air in small spaces in the insulating material packing anything tightly is not the solution. i am not a fan of blown insulation of any kind except in attics. but sometimes you do what you can with what you have. celulose insulation is a good product but you need a vapour barrier. what to do? lay sheet plastic vapour in the attic and blow the insulation on top of it, make sure that you ventilate the attic with roof or gable vents. for the walls paint the INTERIOR with at least two coats of a good oil based paint this will provide a vapour barrier and prevent condensation. the alternative is to remove the drywall on the outside walls install insulation, vapour barrier and new drywall. Icynene Foam is banned in many countries due to problems arising from the gases emitted by it, Canada is one of these countries and we know about insulation here.
Hope this helps
hood

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  #6  
Old 02-15-00, 04:40 PM
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If you blow cellulose at 3.5 lbs you'll blow the sheetrock right off the studs.
What you need is blown in fiberglass insulation. It fills all voids without leaving any air spaces for moisture to condense and will not hold moisture so this should not be a problem. But if your worried about a vapor barrier use a vapor barrier paint on your sheetrock.
Hope this helps.

Mark Eddy
Proffesional Insulation Installer
 
  #7  
Old 10-27-05, 05:13 AM
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Mark,
From what you say this insulation question is similar to mine. I assume I could also blow in fiberglass insulation in my outer walls through holes in the sheetrock and not fear condensation in the walls. It's a fifteen year old brick/steel building with metal studs.
There is no vapor barrier--as far as I know.

Thanks
 
  #8  
Old 10-27-05, 07:43 AM
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It seems to me there are as many opinions on insulation as there are people to ask, and that people with very similar backgrounds will often provide contradictory answers, generally with great conviction. I have variously heard that cellulose is better, that fibreglass is better, that no insulation is better, that you need a vapour barrier and that you don't need a vapour barrier, all from reliable sources.

I think it is best, if you can afford it, to go with a reputable installer of some product with a reasonable track record (cellulose or fiberglass), follow their reccomendations and then at least you have some recourse if things go badly wrong. Otherwise, shake the chicken bones, throw them and let that be your guide.
 
  #9  
Old 10-27-05, 10:49 AM
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Icynene Foam is banned in many countries due to problems arising from the gases emitted by it, Canada is one of these countries and we know about insulation here.
Hope this helps
hood

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Icynene is not banned in Canada, at least not in Manitoba. Just had my walls done with it.

UREA Formaldehyde insulation has been banned here for more than 20 years.

Jon
 
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