Foam type of insulation

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-25-00, 06:45 PM
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Question

We built an apartment above the garage. We had once seen an insulation on I think
"Hometime", it was sprayed into the open walls, expanded. They then took a saw and cut
off the foam that was past the studs. This
way the drywall could connect to the studs as
normal. Does anyone no what type of insulation this is and anything else about it
you may know. Thanks
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-26-00, 07:03 PM
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Post

Sounds like high expansion urea foam. This insulation is excellent. However it is the most dangerous building material known to man.

Since it expands so much, if it is put on too thick initially, it will collapse or crush anything in its way as it expands. If you've never used it, be extremely careful. It can also make quite a mess too.

------------------
MTAC - Van Buren,MO
www.carpenter.cjb.net
Home repair & Construction

"Where the character and work are always upright"

Anything worth cutting down a tree for, is worth doing right.
www.toolreview.cjb.net
 
  #3  
Old 04-12-00, 08:42 PM
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Cool

Rich -- As an insulation contractor, I can tell you that what you saw on Hometime was Icynene foam. (ice-uh-neen) The moderator is in error. It is not dangerous, in fact it is the best insulation I have ever seen. Although it is somewhat expensive,it can do what no other insulation can. It stops radiation, convection, and conduction all at the same time, and it doesn't burn or melt like other foams. They spray it into the stud cavity and it expands 100 times in 8 seconds. Since it fills the entire stud cavity with foam, you also eliminate air leakage, convection currents within the wall and humidity intrusion. It was developed in Toronto about 24 years ago and has been installed in about 20.000 buildings in the U.S. I believe they have a web page under the same name. As for urea-form. foam, it was banned 20 years ago.
 
  #4  
Old 04-14-00, 03:30 PM
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Smile

Thank you so much for the info. I will check
out that page on the internet.
 
  #5  
Old 04-26-00, 07:23 AM
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Question

Subsequent questions. Does icynene installation require ventilation or any sort of vapor barrier? Is any additional moisture control needed? What keeps roof sheathing from moisture/rot?
 
  #6  
Old 04-26-00, 10:36 AM
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Post

I agree with the Icynene info supplied by the second gentleman. We are looking to build our first home and I have been checking into the Icynene. This is what we want for all the reasons listed in the second gentleman's reply; and, yes, it is more expensive up front but from what I can determine your utility costs will be decreased from 30-50%
 
  #7  
Old 04-26-00, 06:51 PM
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Post

What I was trying to get across is that this is not a DIY process. Because this expands 100 times in 8 seconds, if in untraned hands there could be extremely unplanned results.

Yes it is very good stuff.

Your properly installed roof is what keeps the roof sheathing dry.

------------------
MTAC - Van Buren,MO
www.carpenter.cjb.net
Home repair & Construction

"Where the character and work are always upright"

Anything worth cutting down a tree for, is worth doing right.
www.toolreview.cjb.net
 
  #8  
Old 05-02-00, 08:14 PM
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Question

Additional questions regarding the above foam insulation. Would this be a process that would be suitable for a older pier and beam house to cut down on the draftiness of an old wood floor? Also, does anyone know the rate a contractor would charge for this? Also what are the tools used for applying this type of insulation?
 
  #9  
Old 05-05-00, 10:00 PM
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Post

Best way to find out what a contractor will charge is to ask him or her for an estimate. Rates will vary from area to area. The equipment and expertise required to install icynene insulation puts it beyond a DIY project. <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by spence18:
Additional questions regarding the above foam insulation. Would this be a process that would be suitable for a older pier and beam house to cut down on the draftiness of an old wood floor? Also, does anyone know the rate a contractor would charge for this? Also what are the tools used for applying this type of insulation?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

 
Reply


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:13 AM.