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A little confused about terminology and procedure...


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10-10-00, 07:57 AM   #1  
This weekend, I'll be removing drywall and insulation, replacing 2 windows, and putting in new insulation in the same room. I purchased r-13 kraft faced batts for the 2 exterior walls, and i know they are hung with the paper facing out. Is the paper called the "vapor barrier" or is a vapor barrier a separate material, like plastic sheeting over the entire wall? Are the kraft faced batts enough? Or should I be adding something else?


 
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10-10-00, 10:01 AM   #2  
Mike Dee. The Kraft paper on your R-13 fiberglass batts is the vapor barrier. If you were using unfaced batts you would have to install a plastic vapor barrier over the insulation. The vsap[or barrier is sometimes called a vapor diffusion retarder. Gene Leger

 
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10-10-00, 10:15 AM   #3  
Thanks Gene. That is what i thought, but was a little worried i was missing something.

By the way, I'm originally from Hudson, got a ton of relatives in Nashua, and 2 brothers in Manchester.

 
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10-12-00, 12:07 PM   #4  
Mike Dee. Forgot to tell you to not stape the Kraft flaps to the inside faces of the studs. This widespread, common practice is wrong. If your having the gypsum wallboard (GWB) professionally hung, tell them about the nailinf of the flaps to the exterior facesof the stids.

Nailing the flaps to the interior faces of the studs compresses the fiberglass insulation, creates an air space--which is a code violation (1996 BOCA code Section 723.3.1). Because the tpers do not tape the bottom of the GWB to the floor it creates a convective loop: cold air moves along the floor, under the GWB and up the face of the insulation, over the top of the batts and down the back of the insulation. The warm air condenses on the cold exterior wall sheathing and ice forms betwen the back of the fiberglass and the exterior sheathing.

Can I call your Nashua re;atives and tell them you're OK? Gene Leger

 
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