Double vapor barrier question

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-14-03, 03:03 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: West-Central Illinois
Posts: 73
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Double vapor barrier question

I'm in the process of doing a complete "gut job" on a bedroom. I'll be replacing the old blow-in insulation with batts. My understanding is that a plastic vapor barrier is better than the Kraft facing; however, I'll be using Kraft-faced batts rather than unfaced because they are less expensive at the local lumberyard.

Here's my question: Will using plastic sheeting along with the faced batts cause any problems? I can't see why they would, but I just want to make sure.

Thanks in advance.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-14-03, 08:38 PM
R
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 1,875
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
There isn't a problem with installing the plastic over the kraft faced insulation. Why your local supply store sells faced insulation less than unfaced makes me wonder why. May I suggest that you shop around and even search the web for some, you might be able to get it even cheaper than what your local supply store sells it.
 
  #3  
Old 02-15-03, 06:09 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: West-Central Illinois
Posts: 73
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Resercon, thanks for your reply.

My original post may have been misleading. The kraft faced insulation isn't cheaper per square foot; the difference is that for some reason the stores in the area don't carry unfaced insulation in rolls under 150 square feet, and I can get faced in 50 SF rolls. Since I only need about 80 SF, the total cost for faced will be less than unfaced.
 
  #4  
Old 02-18-03, 01:49 PM
rbisys
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Greetings,

Why use an insulation that is less than 10% eff., loses up to 50% of its "R" value, is carcenogenic, condensates moisture by the buckets, stinks and can cause serious mold problems?

I would recommend a 97% eff. raniant barrier sys. Has none of the problems and will make you house more comfortable and cheaper to heat and cool.

Thank you for considering my opinion.
 
  #5  
Old 02-19-03, 09:05 AM
darianw
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Hello Rbisys,

Are you commenting on the insulation itself or the type of barrier? (I'm new to insulation and barriers, sorry if this seems like a stupid question.)

Which insulation do you recommend that's more efficient and retains in R value, etc., etc.?

Do you mean *radiant* barrier? Also, do you have any links to sites that sell or have info on it?

Thanks,
Darian.



Originally posted by rbisys
Greetings,

Why use an insulation that is less than 10% eff., loses up to 50% of its "R" value, is carcenogenic, condensates moisture by the buckets, stinks and can cause serious mold problems?

I would recommend a 97% eff. raniant barrier sys. Has none of the problems and will make you house more comfortable and cheaper to heat and cool.

Thank you for considering my opinion.
 
  #6  
Old 02-20-03, 07:55 AM
lou s.
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Duster,as long as it'll fit,use r-30 faced batts.As long as there is at least a foot of clearance,you'll be just fine with such a small area.Don't "double up" you're vapor barriers-that's a NO-NO!They come in 4ft. pre-cut batts,50 ft. per bag-2 bags will do you just fine.
 
  #7  
Old 02-21-03, 03:25 PM
rbisys
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Greetings,

Lou, if you can provide ligetimate testing data show'g that an "R" 30 batt gets "R" 30 in the installed condition, I'll pay for your next job, labor and material.

Thank you for considering my opinion.
 
  #8  
Old 02-21-03, 04:22 PM
Ed Imeduc's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Mountain Williams Missouri
Posts: 18,389
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
insulation

Try this www and see just what our government thinks about RB over FG. You get a pay back with FG you dont with RB

http://www.ornl.gov/roofs+walls/radiant/rb_02 ED
 
  #9  
Old 02-21-03, 09:54 PM
lou s.
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Rbisys,I don't want to start an arguement here,but I'm curious as to the big deal you keep hinting to about radiant batts.I work for Gale Industries,the nations largest contractor,have for 14 yrs.,Certainteed Certified installer,and now am going for Master I nstaller.We're up in Chicago suburbs,and honestly,the only "radiant batts" we have used were only some "special" Owens Corning batts that were used in conjuction with the radiant floor heat(water heated from beneath floor-these batts were installed just below to create a "superior" heating system)I have been head man on both B.I.B.s systems(loose fill fiberglass on ext.walls),and for the wet spray on cellulose systems.Now by a guess,I'm willing to bet you are talking about a more costly,less used product that probably costs too much for people to pay attention to.I.E.,the spray on foam that goes for about twice the price,or the denim/cotton insulation.I'm not saying you are wrong about this product,because like the old saying goes"insulation is the only trade you pay for that is designed to save you money-not cost you money" With the r-30 batts,ya know,everything does what it should in a perfect world,or situation.But as for an 80 sq. ft. addition,homeowner job,I'd throw in r-30 batts,and wouldn't even think twice about it.If it was mine,I'd have it blown in,but I wouldn't have to pay for it.Like I said,not argueing here,just stating that I've been around the block here,and am curious as to what this "R-B" is all about.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: