insulation

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-26-03, 03:14 PM
giggy
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
insulation - trouble

How can you insulate behind drywall?
The Basement was redone after a fire, the walls were treated (i'm assuming) and new drywall was put up 3" in front of the basement walls, and no insulation or vapor or tar paper was put down in front.
Basically, a fire re-do, made to look nice and sell.
I have had some diff. advice, like - Walls are probably sprayed with sealant (because of the fire) and you may blow in insulation, and double paint the drywall with oil based paint for the vapor barrier?
Or use a new ceramic paint with r-value on the drywall.
What about cellulose? Do you need the barriers on the basement wall, and barrier on top of the cellulose like regular insulation, or do u just blow it in.
Help!!
Also, spotted some black mildew? coming in on one old wall, right on the new dryall.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-26-03, 03:21 PM
giggy
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
insulation

What is great stuff?

for insulation, or sealing?
 
  #3  
Old 02-26-03, 08:32 PM
R
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 1,875
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Great Stuff is a slow and low expanding foam used to air seal and insulate areas in order to have a continuous thermal and air barrier. Concerning insulation, it prohibits heat from by-passing the insulation through gaps around some edges of the insulation. Though much of this heat is air transported, moisture is usually associated with the heat in this air. So air sealing has more to do with moisture problems.
 
  #4  
Old 02-26-03, 08:41 PM
R
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 1,875
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The mildew is caused by moisture. You cannot insulate the wall until you determine the source of the mildew and the only way you can do that is by removing the drywall where the mildew is occurring. It maybe moisture trapped behind the old wall when they put out the fire or a leak in the masonry wall or heat condensing on or inbetween the old wall and masonry. In either case, you must first address the moisture problem, then you can insulate if you want.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: