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attic insulation ?


bryan77's Avatar
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05-07-03, 02:23 PM   #1  
bryan77
attic insulation ?

Im in the process of removing old insulation in my attic, for a couple reasons. I plan on rewiring the house, so to make it a little easier on me, I will get it out of the way. Second reason is I believe I may have to much insulation if there is such a thing, My house gets extremely hot from about 2 or 3 pm till after we go to bed, It doesnt breath very well. All I have is 2 ridge vents, but plan on putting in more ventilation when I reroof later this yr. I have no soffits on the outside of the house, my roof slope stops at the face of the house, and thats it, of course with gutters mounted on the face of that. When I started removing this insulation out, I noticed insulation shoved down the slope of the roof, which in my house from the attic floor to the outside wall slopes about 4 or 5 feet. Even though I dont have outside soffits overhangs, do I still get airtravel up these spaces, And should they be left uninsulated?

I have 6" joist, which had 2 layers of 3 1/2 paperlined, and looked like silver lined backing, plus about 8" of blown in yellow fiberglass insulation on top of that.

What is a reasonable amout of insulation I should have and what type? Cost wise I am contemplating reusing the yellow blown in fiberglass insulation? Is that ok to do. If not what should I use. I was looking at some kind of radiant barrier to help the heating bills, and reduce the amount of heat upstairs in the summertime, my airconditioner cant keep up, the upstairs is usually 15 degrees warmer if not more!


Sorry this is so long, but without seeing it, it may be hard to understand! thanks in advance!

I posted this in the attics page also, not sure where it belonged!

 
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05-07-03, 07:27 PM   #2  
It sounds like you have a cape cod home. Sometimes there is a lower vent and the insulation is obstructing it. Your gutter is attached to your facia board and the roofing shingles drop or lap into the gutters. The way they provide a vent in this area is when they install the facia board, they install it 2 inches below the roof decking. Then they install the gutters and roofing shingles. The 2 inch gap between the roof decking and facia board is your vent.

So the air you feel in that area may be coming from there. If that is the case, then all you have to do is install styrofoam baffling or cardboard to prohibit the insulation from obstructing the vent. It will probably make the house cooler too.

 
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06-03-03, 08:08 PM   #3  
bryan77
Ok resercon, thanks for the info, I have steadily been working on my attic, and have been thinking about what you have described. I have no roof vents at all upper or lower, and when I look outside I see no gap between my fascia board and the wall for air travel. Now like I described I have about a 4 to 5 foot slope from my attic floor to the outside and it is filled with insulation, so with there being no gap and no vents between the roof line and where the attic meets, there is no way I can get air travel up this space without taking out the insulation and going outside and spacing away my facia board, My only concern would be the slanted ceiling space that is in the bedrooms on the 2nd floor,( between the attic floor ant the outside walls), if I open that up for air travel wont that be bad in the winter time and make the room cold. Could I have the roofer install vents just above my 2nd floor ceiling, and either have a ridge vent or more vents 6 ft away at the top of the roof?.................... Can we post pictures on this site. it may be easier to understand my problem seeing a picture? I know this isnt exactly the right section for this, but you seemed to grasped what I was trying to explain better then anyone else.

 
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06-03-03, 08:48 PM   #4  
Hi Bryan,

For a ridge vent system to function properly there must be equal amount of both intake ( soffet vents) as there is ridgevent (exhaust venting)

Certainteed has some very good info on their site, here's a link.
http://www.certainteed.com/solutions/attic/index.html

You can't post pics here, it's not allowed , but you can post them up on the net & provide a link here. Do a google search for picture websites & you'll find some options.

Hope that helps you out.

 
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06-03-03, 08:55 PM   #5  
bryan77
If I cant do soffit venting, will regular roof vents at the base of my attic(which is about half way up my roof from the outside) allow enough air in, or should I have a different method, right now this is all in the planning stages as I have no venting at all, just 2 gable vents, that so conveintly got covered up by the shady siding guys for the previous owners................... they thought it was suffice enough to cut slots with a power saw and call it good enough

 
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06-04-03, 07:20 PM   #6  
Drip edge venting is one option you should look into. It is basically what I explained earlier. Putting roof vents near the bottom of your roof does raise some concerns, especially when you have snow on the roof. Remember, shingled roofing systems are water shedding systems and not water tight systems. You don't want anything on your roof that will have the tendancy to hold water on the roof, especially towards the bottom of the roof. Roof vents would probably be my last choice and if I did use them there, I would choose one with the lowest profile.

 
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06-04-03, 08:20 PM   #7  
bryan77
I see your point on the roof vents, But my only concern with droping the facia board and using that as my inlet, would be the area on the second floor, that 4 or 5 feet of ceiling with no insulation would be awful cold here in the winter.

 
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06-04-03, 08:46 PM   #8  
If there is no insulation in the attic there would be no need for the vents. If you decide to insulate this area then attic ventilation would be required. When installing this type of drip edge venting, styrofoam baffles are used to allow clear air passage from the drip edge venting to the gable and/or ridge vents. The baffles prohibit the insulation from obstructing the air passage.

 
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06-04-03, 08:52 PM   #9  
bryan77
wow thanks for the fast reply, do these baffels get nailed up on the roof sheeting or they nail right to the botton of the rafters, right now there is insulation shoved down, im assuming all the way to the outside edge around 4 or 5'................. Can I put these baffels and new insulation in without tearing up my 2nd floor sloped section of my ceiling. Thanks for all the help, you have no idea how helpful you ( and this site for that matter) has been. This place is awesome.

 
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06-05-03, 06:43 AM   #10  
The baffles are put up against the underside of the roof sheathing where insulation is installed and it might obstruct the air flow. In places where there is poor access, the baffles are slide down up against the sheathing and the insulation is slide inbetween the baffles and the ceiling. Where there is access to the area the baffles are usually stapled against the sheathing or to the rafters just to hold it up. Meaning to say the insulation would probably hold the baffles against the sheathing but it's easier to installed the baffles and the insulation if they are stapled.

 
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06-05-03, 09:34 AM   #11  
bryan77
Thanks a bunch

 
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