insulation and wallboard

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  #1  
Old 05-07-03, 11:12 PM
anp856
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insulation and wallboard

Hi everyone,

We just built a new wood frame house and are set to do the insulation. After it is set in between the studs, can we just screw the sheetrock directly onto the studs, or does there need to be an airspace between the sheetrock and the insulation? We're using rockwool in panels with a kraft paper vapor barrier.

Thanks!

Carole
 
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  #2  
Old 05-08-03, 02:54 AM
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At one time it was considered good to leave the one inch gap between the insulation and wall board. Studies have shown that it is better not to leave this gap between these two types of materials.
 
  #3  
Old 05-08-03, 11:15 AM
anp856
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further question...

I typed my question but it went away so here I go again...

In our little house, the second floor has walls that are formed by the roof slope on the front and back of the house. We will insulate them as well as the little 3 foot wide ceiling at the top (there is an attic/crawl space above that houses the ventilation system).
My question is, for walls that are also part of the roof, can we just put the sheetrock directly onto the roof studs like for the walls downstairs, or are there special rules for roof/walls?

Thanks again for your help, I really appreciate it. We are building a wood frame house in France, where they are not very common, and I need advice from outside of France!

Carol
 
  #4  
Old 05-08-03, 11:44 AM
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The wall that you are referring to is known as a slant wall. When installing insulation up against the roof you should install baffles first, then the insulation and then the sheet rock. The baffles allow air to pass from the facia vents to the ridge vents.

I am not sure if they have them in France but they are usually made of styrofoam that fit between the rafters and is cupped to prohibit the insulation from touching the underside of the roof. This leaves a gap between the underside of the roof and the insulation for air to pass.

If they don't have baffles in France then you can create this gap with string and staples. The way this is done is staple the string to one rafter about 2 inches from the underside of the roof. Then with the same string staple it to the other rafter about 6 to 8 inches below diagonally. Making sure the string is taunt between the staples. Continue to staple the string from one rafter to the other until the area where the slant wall is covered by the string. Then staple the string horizontally to the other rafter and then staple the string diagonally to the other rafter, but upwards. This should cross the string you already stapled. Continue stapling up the rafter crossing the string each time you staple forming an "X" each time. The string will prohibit the insulation from obstructing the air movement.

A little trick here is to tape a 2 inch small block of wood to the front of the stapler. So all you have to do is put the small block of wood against the underside of the roof and you don't have to measure each time you staple. Once you get the knack of doing this, it will go real fast.
 
  #5  
Old 05-08-03, 12:57 PM
anp856
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ok

Ok, thanks! That sounds like something we could handle.
I love the trick of taping the block to the nose of the stapler!

Carol
 
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