60 year old house

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  #1  
Old 05-11-03, 07:57 PM
dsiegris
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Question 60 year old house

I recently bought a 60 year old home. This winter I noticed that the pans, dishes and food in the cupboards were almost (if not) ice cold. I am assuming that there is either none at all or very poor insulation in my kitchen walls. What are my options of raising the R value? Please reply with any true options. Cheap and efficient is what I am looking for.
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Old 05-13-03, 07:26 PM
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Though not having insulation in the walls maybe a contributing factor why things in your cupboard are cold, it is not the only factor. Regardless of the type of heating system you have, the majority of heat transfer is done through convection. This is how heat is transferred from one object to another object using air as a medium. This is the reason why it is cooler in your cupboards and closets. If you leave the doors open in either your cupboards or closets, the temperature inside them would be the same temperature outside them.

The reason why I'm telling you this is because if you decide to insulate the walls the temperature inside your cupboards may improve but not by that much. And probably not as much as you would expect.

The most practical and least disruptive way of insulating walls is to have insulation blown-in. Contact a local insulating contractor and get estimates and ask him what methods he uses to assure complete coverage.
 
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Old 05-14-03, 06:07 AM
dsiegris
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Question blown insulation

I have heard tails of blown insulation being packed to tightly and making walls sweat and stuff like that. Is that simply old wives tails or is there merit to those tails? That was a long time ago, has it improved enough to the point that it isn't a problem anymore?
 
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Old 05-14-03, 06:49 AM
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http://www.eere.energy.gov/consumeri...riefs/bd4.html This is a U.S. Dept. of Energy brief on vapor barriers. One of the first topic discussed is "Thermal Moisture Dynamic." This explains how and why moisture occurs with insulation. What it explains is that the vast majority of moisture related problems with insulation is air transported moisture. What this explicitly implies is the moisture problem with blown-in insulation was a result of the insulation not being installed tightly enoungh, the exact opposite of what you were led to believe.

Today experienced insulating contractors use a method known as dense packing. This is specifically designed to avoid moisture related problems by prohibiting air movement inside and around the blown-in insulation. Therefore, when choosing a insulating contractor, one of the things you should inquire about is the method of insulating he intends to do to avoid problems, such as moisture.
 
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