Insulation for my pole garage

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  #1  
Old 09-21-03, 06:52 PM
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Insulation for my pole garage

My son has a 24'x24' pole garage and wants to insulate it. The garage will be used to house two vehicles and will not be heated at the present but could be in the future.

The garage is located in Southern Ohio. I have had numerous suggestions concerning this but would like one more I guess.

The walls are 3/8 sheeting with vinyl siding. The roof has 3/8 sheeting with 30 year shingles with two gable vents and two 12"x12" roof vents. The floor is concrete.

The main poles are 8"x8".

As far as blow in wall insulation vs Owens Corning panel boards or something else, can you give your opinion on how to insulate this garage?

Thank you
 
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Old 09-21-03, 08:47 PM
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http://www.naima.org/pages/resources...ations/mb.html

Try this site, there are also instructions on how to install it.
 
  #3  
Old 09-24-03, 04:30 PM
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Dear Sir

Its not the installation but what is more benificial as far as R-Value.

Thank You
 
  #4  
Old 09-24-03, 06:58 PM
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The LAW of DIMINISHING RETURNS

The most cost effectiveness of insulation are in the initial R-Values. To illustrate it is what the R-Values mean. The standard is 32 degrees Fahrenheit outside and 70 degrees Fahrenheit inside. An R-19 will transmit 1/19th of a BTU through a square foot of R-19 an hour. An R-5 will transmit 1/5th, R-6 an 1/6th and so on. This explicitly implies that the lower R-values have the larger heat loss and the higher R-Values have the lesser heat loss.

Another way of illustrating this is R-2 is 1/2 with the standard, which is a 50% loss. R-3 is 1/3rd, which is a 33% loss. R-4 is 1/4th which is a 25% loss and so on. According to the standard, an R-19 is 1/19th which is a little bit more than a 5% loss. At this point other factors come into play. This is because most structures are designed to accept R-19 or less.

Clearly the ideal installation is when the maximum R-Value insulation is installed without any additional remodelling to the structure. It is more cost effective to install a R-13 in a wall 3 1/2 inches deep than a R-19 that you have to frame out the wall to accomodate the 5 1/2 inches of insulation. As well as it is better to use a high density R-15 insulation in a 3 1/2 inch wall cavity than a R-13.

So it is not just the R-Value that counts here, it is what exactly can the wall cavities can accomodate for insulation and the ease of installation. Rigid board insulation may have a higher R-Value per inch but the installation is considerably more difficult than batt insulation. As well if the wall cavities are 4 feet wide the rigid board insulation would be easier to install than batt insulation.
 
  #5  
Old 10-02-03, 01:32 PM
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Thank you for your reply. But now I am confused worse. All I wanted is to know what is more benefical as insulation goes, blow in - ridgid foam board or batts that come in rolls.
 
  #6  
Old 10-02-03, 01:41 PM
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The answer is... it depends on the R value of the insulation you select.
 
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