R13 or R19 for my finished basement

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-30-03, 09:28 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Lexington, KY
Posts: 38
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
R13 or R19 for my finished basement

I am remodeling my basement. I have placed 2x4s 1.5" inches from the foundation. I want as much insulation as possible.
I will purchase batt insulation with a vapor barrier face.

Can I use R19 in the 5" space that I will have? This will compress
the insulation slightly, correct (it is 6.25")? Or should I use R13, as this will have the added benefit for a small vent area between the insulation and the foundation? Any issue with the insulation being against the poured foundation?

Thanks Bill.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-30-03, 11:02 AM
R
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 1,875
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I would recommend using the R-13 in this application, leaving an air gap between the insulation and the masonry wall. This space is known as a drainage plane. Basically what it does is act as a buffer between the different rates of absorption and expulsion of moisture materials have. In this situation it is the insulation and the masonry.

Furthermore, heat transfer through insulation and/or materials are determined by the temperature difference inside the structure verses outside. What this basically means is the greater the temperature difference, the more heat transfer. Basement walls below grade do not have that great as a temperature difference as the walls above the basement. This is because the basement walls below grade are protected by the ground around them. The result is the heat loss through the basement wall structure with R-13 will be considerable less than the walls above the basement walls that might have R-19 in them.

R-13 or R-19 is measured by a standard such as inside temperature being 70 degrees Fahrenheit and the outside temperature being 32 degrees Fahrenheit. This is considered a constant for the purpose of rating material thermal conductivity.
 
  #3  
Old 10-30-03, 12:05 PM
brickeyee
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
The units of R for insulaton are (BTU * in)/(hr*ft^2*F). It is a direct measure of the heat loss for a stated thickness of inslation (in) per hour, per suqure foot, per degree F. It is measured at a standard temperature difference, but that does not enter into the final value.
 
  #4  
Old 10-31-03, 06:15 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Lexington, KY
Posts: 38
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
R13 it is.

I did not put a moisture barrier between the foundation and the studs. I have 1/2 the framing done. Should I reconsider this and slide a m.b. in?
 
  #5  
Old 10-31-03, 07:18 AM
Ed Imeduc's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Mountain Williams Missouri
Posts: 18,389
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
basement

I would for sure put a V/B just a 2 mil there over the cement wall. Just tack it to the sill plate and let it hang. ED
 
  #6  
Old 10-31-03, 07:53 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Lexington, KY
Posts: 38
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I can tack it to the sill plate at the top.
I read the idea installation is to lay it under the sill plate of the 2x4 walls. I am alreay 1/2 framed. Any ideas on how I should proceed?
 
  #7  
Old 10-31-03, 09:32 AM
Ed Imeduc's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Mountain Williams Missouri
Posts: 18,389
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
basement

Id just put it where you can now and keep going. That bottom plate is green wood I hope. ED
 
  #8  
Old 11-02-03, 07:56 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Lexington, KY
Posts: 38
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yes the bottom is PT.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: