what insulation for water pipe

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-05-04, 08:47 AM
actonwang
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
what insulation for water pipe

Hi,all:

I think that somebody might already have asked this
question. I am a lazy person, so want to ask it again

Some pipes are exposed down unfinished basement so
I will wait sometime to let water get hot. I want to put some
insulation around those pipes because I believe those exposed
pipes are causing problems.

There are a lot of material out there and I don't know which
one is suitable for this event. Pipe Wrap tap, Polyethylene, or Self-
Adhesive Insulated Foam ...? Do I need to care for R-value? I am
living in Washington DC area. so the weather is around 30-50 in
winter.
I searched in homedepot. there is a brand named "frost
king". How aobut it?

thanks, all gurus!!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-05-04, 09:01 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 1,873
The "Frost King" is probably your best bet, just make sure you get it for the right pipe size (3/4" or 1/2").

As far as insulating the pipes to resolve your problem with waiting for hot water, the pipe insulation might aleviate the problem but certainly will not resolve it for you. The following link will.

http://www.autocirc.com/Autocirc.htm
 
  #3  
Old 01-06-04, 12:22 PM
Ed Imeduc's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Mountain Williams Missouri
Posts: 18,389
Exclamation Hot water

Put the insulation on the pipes. That autocirc thing will just make you pay for more hot water. If you want to do that you dont need a pump. Just take and put a 3/8 copper line there on the last hot water pipe and run it down and back to the water heater on the bottom of it you will have hot water at the end of the line all the time. Or go to www.sets-tankless.com and put this in there in the bath you will have hot water right now. But in all ,cost wise go with the Frost King it will save you on the water bill . ED
 
  #4  
Old 01-07-04, 07:06 AM
actonwang
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
good advice.

I think that to put copper line down from end is not eligible for me.
I bought a "2 In. X 30 Ft. Self-Adhering Pipe Wrap Tape" frost king
from homedepot. I want to put them on to give it a shot. it says
it agaisnt heat loss up to 160F.

hope that it works (even just shorten my waiting time).
The tankless heater is interesting. But don't see anyone around
me use it before. Maybe next time give it a try. Is it DIY heater?
 
  #5  
Old 01-08-04, 08:07 AM
HotBacon's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Shillington, PA
Posts: 153
How did the pipe wrap tape work out for you? Anyone know if the adhesive wrap is any better/different from the foam slide on insulation??
 
  #6  
Old 01-08-04, 08:33 AM
Ed Imeduc's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Mountain Williams Missouri
Posts: 18,389
Lightbulb water pipe

Id use the foam kind over the wrap any time . Or like on the REF lines we use the foam called armaflex It comes in different thickness. ED
 
  #7  
Old 01-09-04, 09:48 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 39
Ed,

Would you recommend that type of insulation for any type of hot water pipe coming from, or in the basement? I just moved into a new house and I want to insulate all of the pipes down there. My basement is warmer than my first floor because of the wasted heat!!

Thanks!!

Irish
 
  #8  
Old 01-09-04, 10:07 AM
Ed Imeduc's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Mountain Williams Missouri
Posts: 18,389
Lightbulb Insulation

If you mean the hot water boiler pipes no. There is a type of fiberclass insulation for the boiler pipes that you should use. ED
 
  #9  
Old 01-09-04, 12:45 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 39
Ok, fiberglass insulation for pipes leading from the boiler...

Are you recommending the foam insulation from pipes connected to the furnace?
 
  #10  
Old 01-09-04, 02:02 PM
Ed Imeduc's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Mountain Williams Missouri
Posts: 18,389
Now do you have a boiler there and a furnace? If furnace is this the REF lines for the AC???? ED
 
  #11  
Old 01-12-04, 04:57 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 39
Ed,

I have a boiler and a hot water heater next to each other, with copper and iron pipes leading out from each of them, ranging in diameter from 0.5" to 2.25".

This weekend I bought a few lengths of 0.5" Frost King tubing for the small copper pipes, and they went on easily. I'm not sure what to do about the larger pipes. The largest premade Frost King products were much too small for the large iron pipes, and the guy at Lowes told me that anything else would be very expensive, and they didn't carry anything suitable for that kind of project.

Some of those pipes are emitting a lot of heat, and I think insulating them properly is worth it. Any thoughts?

Thanks again!

Irishguy
 
  #12  
Old 01-12-04, 06:06 AM
Ed Imeduc's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Mountain Williams Missouri
Posts: 18,389
Lightbulb insulation

My books say that Frost King has a Fiberglass pipe wrap insulation comes in 3" and 6"widths # sp41x and #sp46

Also I see that Frost King hot and cold wrap is good for -30 to a +225 F

Look and ask around there is all I can say . Try a plumbing supply house there by you . They could have the stuff for the big pipes ED
 
  #13  
Old 01-12-04, 09:39 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 39
Excellent advice, Ed - I didn't realize that they carried larger diameters. Thanks a lot for all of your posts; they have been great!
 
  #14  
Old 01-12-04, 08:03 PM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Illinios
Posts: 258
The plumbers at work told me to use fiberglass on my boiler pipes. The black foam insulation that is used for A/C lines will breakdown from the heat in a couple of years
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes