Bad Insulation Job?

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  #1  
Old 02-04-04, 07:04 PM
FN632489
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Question Bad Insulation Job?

About two years ago, I removed paneling from the walls on the basement framing. I painted the walls with DryLock, although I didn't suspect moisure. I then took fiberglass insulation with paper face and stappled it to the studs. I covered the fiberglass with a plastic vapor barrier by stapling the plastic to the studs. Then, I had the whole basement sheet rocked nicely, but only painted with one coat of flat white.

Now, two years later, my basement smells like body odor. If I run a dehumidifier, I don't collect any water. So I am not sure if this is a mold issue. There is no sign of mold or water damage.

Can anyone tell me why my basement walls smell like bad BO? If I sniff the walls, they reak terribly. Any ideas would be greatly welcomed. Could this be an insulation job gone arye?

Regards,

FreddyN
 
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  #2  
Old 02-04-04, 08:16 PM
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If you put the Kraft paper *and* poly vapor barrier on the house side, then you wouldn't expect to pick up moisture with the dehumidifier...
 
  #3  
Old 02-04-04, 09:28 PM
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http://www.epa.gov/iaq/molds/

You apparently have a moisture problem which may have created a mold and/or mildew problem. The way to ascertain if the problem exists is to choose an area on the wall that you can cut open and inspect behind the sheet rock. The above site will give you some useful information on how to deal with the problem if it exists and how to prevent it from occurring.

One of the things that cause problems like you are experiencing are the terms used. For example, Drylock is a basement water proofing product, yet is not considered a vapor barrier. That is because for it to qualify as a vapor barrier it must have a "Perm Rating" of 1 or less. The paper on the insulation you installed had a tar substance on the back of it and the plastic you stapled over it both have "Perm Rating of 1 or less and qualify as vapor barriers. Tyvek, an air barrier used on the outside of houses today, has a "Perm Rating". A high one as a matter of fact. This is because the rule with materials applied after a vapor barrier is 5 to 1. In other words, the Tyvek is specifically designed to have a 5 times greater "Perm Rating" than a vapor barrier. This is done to avoid moisture from being trapped inside the walls. What kind of "Perm Rating" do you think Drylock has?

I like to dispell common misconceptions, fiberglass is glass, take a piece of steel, wood and glass and put them in water, which one will rust, rot or stay the same after a year? Do you think the fiberglass insulation could have caused the moisture problem?
 
  #4  
Old 02-05-04, 12:17 PM
MusicField
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The plastic vapor barrier is the problem. It is acting as a condensation surface because it is impermeable. Moisture escaping from the concrete wall and into the basement space can't dry and dissipate, so it builds up and condenses on the surface of the plastic. The condensation is wetting the paper, wood and FB, supporting mold growth.

The "why" this is happening is explained in the following document:

http://www.buildingscience.com/resou...on_systems.pdf
 
  #5  
Old 02-05-04, 01:27 PM
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If a poly V/B had been put there to cover the cement walls and the paper side of the insulation to the room side then a poly over the insulation then drywall It would be ok to day Thats how we do it all the time and no call backs. ED
 
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Old 02-06-04, 06:54 AM
FN632489
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Question Is there a practical resolution?

Originally posted by MusicField
The plastic vapor barrier is the problem. It is acting as a condensation surface because it is impermeable. Moisture escaping from the concrete wall and into the basement space can't dry and dissipate, so it builds up and condenses on the surface of the plastic. The condensation is wetting the paper, wood and FB, supporting mold growth.

The "why" this is happening is explained in the following document:

http://www.buildingscience.com/resou...on_systems.pdf



MUSICFIELD, thanks for your insight. Is there a practical resolution to this issue?
 
  #7  
Old 02-06-04, 07:13 AM
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[QUOTE] Is there a practical resolution to this issue?[/QUOTE

Why then does it work for us . In basements and earth contact homes. V/B on the cement walls the studs with insulation in them paper to the rooms and V/B pol over that then the dry wall
For over 30 years ??????? ED
 
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