Insulation Needed for Expanded Cape

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  #1  
Old 06-29-04, 10:13 AM
Vince
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Question Insulation Needed for Expanded Cape

I own an expanded cape in New Jersey that was built in the 1950's. I have recently been remodelling the second floor bedrooms (I have a very small space above the rooms, not enough to actually crawl in), and would like to insulate the exterior walls.
The house does not have soffit vents, but does have gable vents. When I removed the sheetrock from the exterior walls, I found some insulation against the roof line, and some pulled away. The front of the house has dog-house dormers and the back has a full dormer, so maybe when they added onto the house, they moved around the insulation. I can not differentiate between old and new insulation- it all looks pretty old.
Is the correct way to insulate this type of application to use baffles against the roof with fiberglas insualtion over it? I also assume that I would have to cut in soffit vents? Is there a better way to provide insulation?
Thanks for the help!
 
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  #2  
Old 07-09-04, 08:57 PM
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You problem is not that unusually in your area. I would recommend installing the styrofoam baffles to allow some sort of ventilation for your roof. Unfortunately the lack of adequate free venting, which is inherent to this type of house, usually causes to noticable signs. In the summer it is usually considerably warmer upstairs than downstairs and in some instances, warmer than it is outside. The other is the roof usually only lasts 15 to 20 years.

For your information the dog house dormer is known as a gable dormer and the one in the back of the house is probably a shed dormer.
 
  #3  
Old 07-12-04, 08:44 AM
Vince
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Thanks for the information.
Do I need to cut in soffit vents?
Thanks.
 
  #4  
Old 07-13-04, 09:12 PM
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If you have the overhang then cutting vents into the soffit area is advisable. Both the gabled and shed dormers usually do not have a soffit area. In some instances with this type of construction the facia boards, this is the board at the bottom of the roof and gutters are usually attached to them, is dropped below the roofing underlayment. This creates a gap for air to enter your attic area. Some people install a drip edge vent there to prevent rodents and insects from entering there.

So to answer your question if you should cut in soffit vents. Yes, if soffits exists on your house, do cut in vents.
 
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