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Attic Floor - used 4x8 sheets


kuhurdler's Avatar
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10-13-04, 06:29 AM   #1  
Attic Floor - used 4x8 sheets

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Last edited by kuhurdler; 02-18-07 at 12:08 PM.
 
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resercon's Avatar
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NJ

10-14-04, 08:15 PM   #2  
If you lay down the masonite over the insulation in the attic, I would recommend checking it periodically. If you find moisture underneath parts of the masonite, then look under the insulation. A lot of times penetrations from lighting fixtures or wires allow heated air from inside the house to escape through them. Then seal the penetrations. If there is no apparent cause for the moisture, then you might want to paint your ceiling with an oil based primer. There are also vapor barrier paints you can use. If that still does not stop the moisture, then the masonite itself is the problem and removing it is probably your only option.

 
kuhurdler's Avatar
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10-17-04, 08:32 PM   #3  
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Last edited by kuhurdler; 02-18-07 at 12:08 PM.
 
twelvepole's Avatar
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OH

10-17-04, 09:06 PM   #4  
As indicated, the concern is that warm humid air may escape from downstairs into attic. If you have recessed lights, wires, or vents that may may leak air into attic around these openings, there is a chance for warm, humid air to pass through attic and into insulation. If insulation is encapsulated by masonite, then the warm, humid air is trapped. Insulation can get wet from condensation and lose its insulative quality and trapped condensation can cause wood decay. As indicated, if there are no openings that cause concern in attic, painting ceiling with oil-based paint will act as a vapor retarder to prevent warm, humid air from downstairs passing into attic area.

Another concern is what you plan to put in the attic. Most truss systems are designed to support only the weight of the ceiling below. Any additional weight, other than storing cardboard boxes (fire hazard) and something lightweight like luggage or Christmas decorations is all that it will support. The prefab truss systems do not allow for attic conversions or storage of heavy objects like furniture.

You can loose lay a few pieces so that you can walk on top trusses to inspect vents, fans, and attic for problems. A few pieces loosely laid can provide some storage for light weight items. If in doubt about the ability of your truss system to support weight, you will need to consult with your building inspector or a building engineer.

 
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