Insulating old "California Bungalow"

Reply

  #1  
Old 06-06-05, 09:16 AM
zeynbungalow
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Insulating old "California Bungalow"

Hi guys,
I have a 1915 bungalow where we've stripped the dining room to the studs to repair some insect damage. I figured that while it was open, I might as well insulate it. The studs are 16" on center, however because they used "real" 2*4s (ie they are two inches wide) I've got a between stud gap of about 14 1/2 inches.

I've already bought 15" batts, can I just curve them to fit or shoud I cut 1/2 an inch off the side. If I do cut it, what do you normally use as staple tabs?

The bats are R13, JM comfort therm, with the plastic sheathing.

Also, I have clap board siding. should I caulk up any gaps/cracks prior to installing the insulation, or do they provide a moisture exit.

I'm in Southern California.

Thanks for your help

Cheers
Peter
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 06-08-05, 06:54 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 1,873
You will not be compressing the insulation that much so I would recommend just curving them in as you described.

As far as caulking the gaps on the backside of your siding, I would recommend against it because you might trap moisture behind the siding.
 
  #3  
Old 06-09-05, 09:48 AM
zeynbungalow
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Insulating old "California Bungalow

Thanks for the reply Resercon.
I've done some more checking, and it seems that the stud spacing is not equal. In several places it is down to 12 inches - so it looks like I'm gong to need to strip some of the insulation off. Is it as easy as cutting it down vertically - while making sure not to cut through the front "staple tab"?

I'm using the "comfort therm" plastic wrapped batts from JM. the plastic is perforated in places - so it looks like I'm going to need a seperate vapor barrier.

Cheers
Peter
 
  #4  
Old 06-09-05, 07:29 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 1,873
It will be quite difficult to cut the insulation the way you intend to. Personally I would cut clear through vertically making sure the width that I cut was a little wider than the wall cavity so that the insulation will stay in place by friction.

If there is only a few perforations, you could tape over them, but if there are several, then you might be better off using a plastic sheet for a vapor barrier.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes