basement ceiling insulation

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  #1  
Old 06-09-05, 10:45 PM
al_bundy
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Question basement ceiling insulation

hello all,
i just moved to an old house. The full unfinished basement has fibergalss insulation on the ceiling with the pink fiberglass exposed facing the unfinished basement. I want to cover the fiberglass as i am concerned with it becoming airborne (if it hasn't already). I have my washer and dryer down there as well some other stuff. I was told i could staple tyvek homewarp on joists as it allows the moisture through. As opposed to using plastic which would trap the moisture (i have a humid basement). However, i just found out that tyvek is combustible and shouldn't be placed close to heating sources (i.e, my furnace). Any other ideas what i could use?. I dont want to put something too permanent such as screwing in sheetrock since i also have my plumbing and electrical up there and may need acceess to it.
thanks for any advice

Al
 
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  #2  
Old 06-10-05, 08:58 PM
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I would still recommend the Tyvek in your situation. Even the insulation over your furnace is required by most towns to be covered with a fire proof material like sheet rock. So in your case, I would install the Tyvek over the insulation and then check with your local building official or local fire department, the size of the area above the furnace that needs to be covered with sheet rock.

For example, if they say that the ceiling above the furnace must be covered with 5/8 inch sheet rock above and three feet around the perimeter of the furnace when insulation is installed in the ceiling. So this section of the ceiling above the furnace must be sheet rocked, but it doesn't mean the rest of the ceiling has to be, nor does it mean you can't use Tyvek over the insulation in that area.
 
  #3  
Old 06-12-05, 07:52 AM
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and I don't think it means you have to actually finish the sheetrock. If you're that concerned about access just put the 'rock up with screws and stop - don't do any tape or mud over the screws. and just to be safe you might want to map out the plumbing, wiring, etc so you know what to remove if you need to get to something.

oh - be sure to run the sheetrock perpendicular to the joists.

-art-
 
  #4  
Old 06-13-05, 12:52 PM
al_bundy
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resercon, sandbagger

thanks for the recommendations!...great ideas.

One thing i was also recommneded tyvek for was that it allows moisture to escape. Would sheetrock do that as well. Since i have a humid basement and sometimes get water on heavy rains I wouldn't want the sheetrock to get moldy. I guess if i had a mold problem then the insulation would already be part of it, right?

cheers,

Alex.
 
  #5  
Old 06-13-05, 03:32 PM
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Originally Posted by al_bundy
.... Since i have a humid basement and sometimes get water on heavy rains I wouldn't want the sheetrock to get moldy. I guess if i had a mold problem then the insulation would already be part of it, right?......
you might see it in the insulation, or might not (yet). Quite often the rain problem points to landscaping around the house. Make sure the dirt slopes AWAY from the house and your gutters (you do have gutters?) work and dump several feet from the house and not near the foundation. There are other procedures that can get pretty pricey, but start with the landscaping and see what happens.

Additionally you might look at a dehumidifier and fan combo. Put the dehumidifier at one end of the basement and fan at the other. Get a timer for the fan and start with it running 4-6 hrs on and 2-3 off. The fan should move a lot of air - Vornado or Patton comes to mind.

There are lots of other options, including one that actually just dumps basement air outside thus sucking drier air from upstairs into the basement. Not only do you take the mold spores out with the moisture, you have the added bonus of eliminating any possible radon if that is a concern. Do some internet searches and you'll get more data than you care to imagine.

-art-
 
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