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no insulation under hard wood flooring/what to do?


dfagan's Avatar
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10-29-05, 07:30 AM   #1  
dfagan
no insulation under hard wood flooring/what to do?

I pulled up wall to wall carpeting in 3 rooms to enjoy the beautiful hardwood floors. One of these rooms is above a finished rec area. The other 2 above the unfinished basement area used for laundry, shop, and storage. Those 2 rooms are chilly and have no insulation under the flooring - which is also the ceiling of the unfinished basement area. There are many pipes, ducts, and wires and need advice on the what insulation to use at a reasonable/cheap yet effective cost.

 
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10-31-05, 05:12 AM   #2  
Part of your basement is finished, so I assume you have heat registers and a return. Could you not install a heat register in the other two areas?

If not, then you could use fibreglass insulation in between the joists. However, it is better to have the space below heated.

 
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11-01-05, 06:58 AM   #3  
Heated Space

Building on that idea, is it more efficient to have an unused space (like a basement or a porch) heated or unheated?

I've been leaving my drafty basement unheated, and closing down my heated porch to reduce the number of heated rooms. I thought that heat rises, and so the cold basement will not affect the upstairs. Is this flawed reasoning?

J

 
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11-06-05, 04:05 PM   #4  
dfagan
The unfinished area of the basement is open and quite large. It is cold in the winter and cool in the summer. Although I do spend a bit of my time in the laundry and shop area, I do think it would be too costly to heat it.
When the carpet was in place it was warmer. I've noticed too, that I can hear alot more below me than before. I too thought heat rises, but a draft is a draft. I have plugged old cable holes but still have the cold air. I am happy to tell you that my October gas usage is about half of what is was last October with this year colder than last. I found french doors in the basement when we moved here 10 years ago. I just completed refinishing the woodwork including the french doors and hung them. I close all the doors and wow thanks for the responses

 
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11-10-05, 08:05 PM   #5  
my two cents

Posted By: jurched I've been leaving my drafty basement unheated, and closing down my heated porch to reduce the number of heated rooms. I thought that heat rises, and so the cold basement will not affect the upstairs. Is this flawed reasoning?

J
My understanding of heat transfer is that energy (heat) flows from warm areas to cold areas. So, as long as your living space is warmer than your basement I think there will be a flow of energy into the basement. I don't think that it matters that the heated space is over the unheated space, this transfer takes place in all directions.

I have hardwoods over an unheated basement / garage and I've begun adding r-13 fiberglass insulation under my floors. I used the little metal rods to hold it in place which has made installation quite straightforward. So far, I've only done this under the kitchen, the coldest room in the house, and my bedroom. I haven't noticed any effect yet, but it has yet to get cold here in NC.

I've also wondered if the reflective / radiant stuff might work, either alone or in conjuction with the fiberglass.

Hope this helps.

 
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11-14-05, 02:00 PM   #6  
I see what you mean about heat transfer.

Under my kitchen, at least, there is crushed pumice stone between the joists. Must be either an old insulation method, or simply support for the 3 inch thick cement floor tiles. In this case, there is no room for insulation. I don't know what's under the living room. There is a permanent ceiling in the basement.

But yesterday I was bashing holes in an interior wall to straighten some electric cables before putting up some sheetrock, and I could feel cold air blasting out, so even in the middle of the house, some serious draughts fill those old plaster walls.

Clearly, insulation in all directions is the only sensible choice. First things first, though: insulation blown in the attic, followed by the upstairs walls.

J

 
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