Walls to the outside are cold.....


  #1  
Old 11-23-05, 11:14 AM
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Walls to the outside are cold.....

Even though it hasnt gotten really really cold here yet, Im feeling pretty cold in my master bedroom. Its basically the product of an addition the previous owners did. It actually overhangs a deck off the back of the house, and its on a corner of the house, so 2 of the walls are exposed to the outside.

The inside of the walls facing outside get *very* cold, and I believe this is causing a draft in the room, and is in turn making me feel cold. The walls are insulated (addition was done in 1984, so its "fairly" modern, looks like standard R13 in 2x4 walls). Ive put plastic over the windows (circa 1984 Andersen gliders, about 4' square) and that helped a little, but the walls still get cold. I knwo some of the cold will come from the fact that they are facing outside, but I was wondering if there was anything else I could do to try to keep them warmer in the winter.

Thanks!
-Chris
 
  #2  
Old 11-27-05, 07:06 PM
chimanb
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Cold outside walls

Did you try the Window insulation kits or just plain plastic?. The kits work really good, forming airtight seal. I had a similiar situatuation, and one thing I've done is (stay with me here) purchased heavy fabric and actually draped it across the wall as if it was a window! Cold air was still coming from the edges, so I stapled/ taped them. It sort of gives me an R5 insulation factor, but is better than it was before!

Thanx,
Chimanb
 
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Old 11-28-05, 07:04 AM
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I'm not sure where you are located, but 2x4s are no longer standard in certain parts for exterior walls. A lot of homes are being built with 2x6 exterior walls with R-20 insulation.

Another factor is that the bedroom overhangs the outside and therefore does not have a heated space below it. This means 3 sides are exposed to the elements.

You can try various quick fixes, but you would be better off doing it properly if you plan on staying in the home for many years.

Suggestions:

1. Remove drywall, install 2x2 furring strips and replace insulation with R-20.
2. Create a false floor (just above the deck) and have warm air from your furnace blow into this space. This is very very effective for creating a comfortable living space above an unheated area and it is by far the best solution.

These are not cheap solutions, but they are permanent and will solve the problem.
 
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Old 11-30-05, 07:50 AM
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Thanks for the suggestions!

Ive tried the plastic over the windows, it helps a little but the walls themselves are still a little chilly.

Would an extra R7 make that large of a difference in the walls? I wouldnt be able to do that anytime soon, considering I just repainted/patched drywall a couple months ago. I wish I would have known before I did all that work!

Only half of the bedroom is over unheated space, but it just so happens to be the half that the bed is located on. I guess extra covers is a good solution, cheap and easy Underneath the bedroom is the living room, someday I could push the living room wall out so that the complete bedroom would be over a heated space (living room).

I agree on doing it right, but unfortunately I dont think Ill be able to do it right this winter. Maybe next year!

Thanks!
-Chris
 
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Old 11-30-05, 04:56 PM
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QUOTE=chrisexv6]
Only half of the bedroom is over unheated space, but it just so happens to be the half that the bed is located on. I guess extra covers is a good solution, cheap and easy Underneath the bedroom is the living room, someday I could push the living room wall out so that the complete bedroom would be over a heated space (living room).

[/QUOTE]

I have the following suggestions that you might add to the list that may work:

1. Caulk any areas that may allow air seepage.

2. Over unheated floor area put down a rug remnant (available from any reputable rug store).

At least your feet maybe warmer.
 
 

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