Basement Insulation

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-28-05, 08:21 AM
howdoo
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Basement Insulation

I have a 1954 Colonial in Long Island, New York with a full, finished baseboard-heated basement. It is heated on its own zone. Consequently, it is not on most of the time. The basement measures approx. 400 sq.ft. It also has a drop ceiling. The first floor of the house is heated by hot-water radiators and are all together on another zone. Above the drop ceiling (and below the first floor) no insulation exists between the joists. There is also no insulation where the floor meets the side of the house.

Question: Is it necessary or worthwhile to insulate any or all of these areas?

Thanks.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-28-05, 09:47 AM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 857
Yes, you should have insulation between the joists against the exterior wall. This would help to keep the cold out. I assume you have access to this area through your basement ceiling.

Insulation in the ceiling of your basement won't help much to keep the upstairs warmer, but it would help with sound transmission. The best way to keep the rooms above the basement at a more balance temperature is to have a heated space below them, i.e. your basement.

Maybe you can install a timer for the basement heating system so that it turns on only during the day.
 
  #3  
Old 11-28-05, 10:14 AM
howdoo
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks for the reply.

Yes, I do have access through the ceiling and will be installing between the joists against the wall. Which R value is recommended?

My thought with the ceiling installation was more to prevent heat loss from the first floor to the basement, although you suggest that it wouldn't do much anyway.

With oil prices nowadays is it feasible to heat such a huge space to warm the upstairs. By the way, would enough heat penetrate the upstairs anyway given the drop ceiling, insulation (if installed for sound) subfloor, and floor?

Sound transmission. Interesting. More so to prevent sound from upstairs penetrating down or vice versa? Which type of insulation is recommended? Thanks.
 
  #4  
Old 11-28-05, 10:45 AM
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 6,125
Basement Insulation

howdo -

Regarding you question on the heating/cooling/insulation of a basement you might find this concept and comparison interesting -

One of the reasons for less or no insulation in a basement is the exterior conditions and air leakage.

In the winter, when people think of insulating basements, the temperature difference between the inside and out side is much less. Above grade, the maximum temperature difference (depending on the climate) is between 20 and 100 degrees. Below ground, the maximum difference is only 10 to 30 degrees because of the moderating effect of the soil. Below ground, there is no air leakage, which is a major heat loss above ground.

In the summer, the temperature difference is also much less. Above grade, the maximum temperature difference is 10 to 30 degrees. Below ground, the maximum difference is 0 to -20 degrees, requiring no air conditioning. In fact, an uninsulated basement can provide a benefit because of the moderating effect of the soil. Also the same difference in infiltration applies.

This is just a simplified example and does not take into account the stability of basement temperatures that can reduce the size of heating and cooling equipment required. Dynamic effects are rarely considering because of the tradition of lightweight construction in the U.S.

Dick
 
  #5  
Old 11-28-05, 12:20 PM
howdoo
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Interesting! So what you're suggesting is that heat loss, especially in winter is more likely to occur from the first floor to the outside rather than to the basement.

How's this for a comeback

My basement is partially submerged -- only about 3 ft. lies below ground and the rest (about 4-5ft.) is above. Now, does the additional of this slight detail change how I should go about putting in insulation either across the entire floor, only in the joists against the wall, or neither?
 
  #6  
Old 11-29-05, 05:16 AM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 857
Reply


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:31 PM.