Insulating converted attic.

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  #1  
Old 01-08-06, 05:23 AM
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Insulating converted attic.

My house (built 1930) has 2 attic bedrooms on the backside of the house using a long dormer out the back. The bedrooms are separated by a corridor from empty attic space at the front of the house. The wall between the corridor and the attic space is insulated as are the exterior walls of the attic space. There is no insulation between the rafters in the attic space except over the living spaces. I was thinking of insulating between the rafters in the unused attic space. The rafters are 6".

My question. What type of insulation should I use? Should I even insulate there at all. It's colder in the attic living spaces. What else could I do? I know leaky windows are part of the problem and I will be plasticing those over.
Thanks for the help.
 
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Old 01-08-06, 12:39 PM
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It is not recommended that you insulate between rafters in unheated, unoccupied attic spaces. Additional insulation can be added between joists. Wall adjacent to heated living space should be insulated. Leaky windows should be repaired or replaced or storm windows installed. Often existing heating/cooling systems can not accommodate attic living spaces that were added on at a later date. Your HVAC professional can tell you if you have an adequate size unit for heating/cooling occupied attic space.
 
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Old 01-08-06, 01:07 PM
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Thanks. I won't insulate there then.

We are replacing the furnace and zoning off the attic with its own circulator pump. The attic heat was added as an afterthought to a moniflow system. Ithink the circulator pump does not have enough oomph to get the heat to the attic. There is insulation alongthe wall you mentioned. Maybe I will beef it up some. The windows will have to be addressed soon.

Thanks again.
 
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Old 01-08-06, 04:00 PM
splippity
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the circulator will have no problem..... if you notice the furnace will have a certain psi on it..... that's used so when the circulator is pushing the water is neutral and can easily be pushed where it needs to go....

would give you the exact math formula on it if I could remember
but I just work in the field I don't have to remember why it is just that it is


*note* I put in a psi number....... though do to where people live and other variables I decided it wasn't useful to leave that in there....... there's factors to consider..... but it'll be able to do it none the less.. aslong as it can make enough hot water the circs can move it.....
oh another good note--- it's good to have the circ on the push rather than the pull.... less problems in the long run.... though theres debate over it but that is more for the plumbing section
 

Last edited by splippity; 01-08-06 at 08:23 PM.
  #5  
Old 01-12-06, 07:47 AM
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Dominant form of heat loss in cold climates is stack effect.

You probably just need a good air sealing package, or replace the attic roof / wall insulation with one of the air tight insulation systems. Even if your furnace is in the basement, heat has a way of finding its way to the attic, so long as the attic is not too leaky.
 
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Old 01-16-06, 11:21 AM
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Originally Posted by doug thomas
Dominant form of heat loss in cold climates is stack effect.

You probably just need a good air sealing package, or replace the attic roof / wall insulation with one of the air tight insulation systems. Even if your furnace is in the basement, heat has a way of finding its way to the attic, so long as the attic is not too leaky.

Would this require removing all the existing sheetrock?
 
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Old 01-17-06, 07:06 AM
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It might.

It may be cheaper to focus on the areas that are currently uninsulated, as they can be insulated even if drywalled (via injection).

Cutting air leakage will also reduce the load on the furnace, even if you are adding volume to the house by moving the insulation to the rafter spaces, as opposed to the joists.
 
  #8  
Old 01-17-06, 05:11 PM
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Sorry, what do you mean by an air sealing package?

As far as I can tell, there is insulation in the attic rafters appropriate for 6 inch rafters (3.5 inches.) I don't know if it's air tight and it was probably put there 60's or 70's. I went after the airleaks there, calking around the window frames and plasticing over the windows. It made a pretty big difference for comfort at least. I am thinking new windows or at the very least storm windows for starters.

And yes, going after the areas where there is no insulation is a good suggestion.

Thanks again.
 
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