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Insulating Ceiling Of Enclosed Porch


passmaster16's Avatar
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Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 3

05-14-06, 09:51 PM   #1  
Insulating Ceiling Of Enclosed Porch

Hi,

I have a room which is about 14 x 10. It used to be a porch, but the previous owner enclosed it. The room is finished with drywall for both the walls and the ceiling. The room has 6 windows and large sliding glass door which lets in a lot of light. Currently there is no ductwork run to the room, but I plan on having this done when I get my furnance replaced. The problem I have is that I was working on installing a ceiling fan in the room today, and upon removing the old electrical box, I peeked up into the open space to find that there is no insulation in there. Obviously this could be a major problem if I wish to heat/cool the room. So at this point, I'm thinking I have two options: 1.) demolish the ceiling, insulate as necessary, then put new drywall up (not an ideal option to say the least) or 2.) use a loose type insulation such as cellulose and spray it into the ceiling

The roof over this area is slightly angled. Then there are joists that run parallel that the drywall ceiling is attached to. Because of the angle of the roof, it appears that there is open space between the roof and the joists. Would I be able to use the hole (about 4" in diameter) that is currently exposed for the ceiling fan to blow cellulose insulation into the ceiling? Would there be any reason I couldn't do this? What about a vapor barrier since I can't actually put anything down as I don't have access to the entire ceiling? Also will ventilation be an issue? Any other suggestions on how I could approach this?

Thanks.

 
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Concretemasonry's Avatar
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05-15-06, 06:16 AM   #2  
Insulating Ceiling Of Enclosed Porch

It sounds like this space will be a conditioned space. This requires a vapor barrier on the warm side.

Your first option will allow you do it correctly (insulation AND vapor barrier) and make sure you take care of the vantilation also.

If you have to do it later it will be much worse and more difficult after you find out you have a problem.

Dick

 
wreckwriter's Avatar
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05-15-06, 06:20 AM   #3  
What about cutting a scuttle hole into the ceiling? This MIGHT allow you to get in far enough to do the work without tearing down the whole ceiling. Then you could just frame it and close it like a standard attic access.

 
Concretemasonry's Avatar
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05-15-06, 03:06 PM   #4  
Insulating Ceiling Of Enclosed Porch

If you will heat the "porch" in the future, then you should have a vapor barrier on the warm side if you are in cool location. Some warm areas do not require vapor barriers.

Dick

 
passmaster16's Avatar
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05-16-06, 07:17 PM   #5  
Thanks for all the responses so far.

After further investigation, it appears that the walls are not insulated either. I took a cover off one of the electrical outlets and peeked through the box but saw nothing except the outer wall. So, my plan of action is to gut the current walls and ceiling. Insulate as needed, then drywall it again. It is more work than I previously thought, but I figure if I'm going to do it, I want to do it right.

I was planning to put kraft faced R-30 in the ceiling with the faced side directed toward the floor. Then I was planning to put kraft faced R-15 in the walls with the faced side directed towards the interior of the room. Would these R values be adequate for this application? Also, should I use kraft faced insulation in both cases, for ceiling and walls (since the walls are external)? The only other question I had was regarding the placement of the ceiling insulation. Should I place it up in the actual rafter or simply lay it over top of the ceiling joist? My only concern with the rafter was keeping the insulation away from the roof itself so that it doesn't overheat. In order to do this, I was planning on using vent baffles http://www.owenscorning.com/around/ventilation/raftrmate_attic.asp From what I can see, there are no soffit vents but I can put a few of those in to provide some ventilation. Since it is a shed type roof, there is no ridge. I was hoping that if I do the soffit venting, it would be enough for the area of this size. Does this make any sense? Any other suggestions/recommendations?

Obviously the previous ower was content with it just being a porch and decided not to insulate it when he installed the drywall. Luckily his drywall job wasn't top quality anyway, so it isn't as though I'm losing a whole lot by ripping it out and starting from scratch. I plan to gut and insulate it myself then have somebody who knows drywall finish the job. We would like to use the room throughout the year as an additional living room/sitting area.

One more off topic question, is there anything I can do with the floor to make it a bit warmer on the feet? The entire floor is made of concrete. Half of it is built over top of unheated basement with the other half (probably extended later) a concrete slab so I only have access underneath one half of the area. The concrete is relatively thick, probably 6-8 inches. I was planning to just put down pad then carpet. Aside from infloor heating, is carpet the best option here?

Thanks Again.

 
wolfclan's Avatar
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05-23-06, 11:57 PM   #6  
Alternative

Actually there is an alternative solution that will save you time and money utilizing the existing structure. We utilize a multiceramic coating primarily on steel warehouses and concrete structures to control thermal migration where internal heat containment is desired or the prevention of external heat migration is required (such as ice arenas and cold storage). On occaision residential customers have used these products to reduce heat build up in the summer or to contain it in the winter.

I would suggest you Google "Super Therm" to further research this product and to locate a distributor in your area.

 
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