moisture in wall

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  #1  
Old 01-28-07, 11:03 AM
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moisture in wall

WE have brick exterior walls and block .The house is 36 yrs old.I notice some of the drywall tape lines are showing on the one wall, and give a little to the touch(like bubbled up or something).I had paneling on the other 3 walls that I have removed.The block wall is covered in plastic sheathing and then a styrofoam board.I heard somewhere not to use plastis sheathing anymore because it won't breath.How do I determine if the moisture is the problem with the drywall or just shotty drywall work?Should i do something different when I hang the new drywall on the walls that had the paneling?Any help would be appreciated.Thanks.
 
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Old 02-05-07, 07:04 AM
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http://www.eere.energy.gov/consumer/your_home/insulation_airsealing/index.cfm/mytopic=11810

You are correct, that application is improper. However, I would be more concerned with discoloring than the bubbling effect. There could be another reason for the bubbling, such as a small roof or pipe leak.
 
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Old 02-05-07, 07:27 AM
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moisture in wall

Where are you located (climate?)

Do you have any weeps at the bottom of the brick veneer and vents near the top?

Dick
 
  #4  
Old 02-06-07, 07:24 AM
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moisture in wall

What do the weep holes and vents look like and where would they be located?There is no water lines through those walls.We live in the Cleveland area of Ohio.The wall is on the back of our house and there are bedrooms above this wall.I believe it is on the north side.I have noticed moss on the concrete patio outside so I am wondering if all this is happening due to the location of the wall(it's shady).Nothing has been noticed on the other wall with the same application that face east and south.
 
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Old 02-06-07, 07:30 AM
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moisture in wall

Ther are no pipes in that wall and the wall is on the backside(north side) of the house.The wall is on the first level of a split level house with a slab in that room.The room also leads out to a patio which that wall is on.No discoloring.Other walls in the house with the same application but different locations ie. east,west do not have this issue.What would the proper application be for those walls?
 
  #6  
Old 02-06-07, 09:26 AM
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moisture in wall

I am assuming you have an exterior wall that has brick veneer attached to a concrete block wall. This is not common in your area. It may also be brick veneer on a wood frame wall with a block foundation shoeing above. This gap provides a drainage plane to remove any exterior moisture. - In any case, there should be weeps to permit moisture from exit the area between the brick and the wall behind.

The weeps usually look like holes or gaps in the vertical mortar joints at the bottom of the wall. - Usually some material in inserted to prevent "critters" from entering - rope wicks, spun foam, etc. There should also be vents near the top of the wall, but often above the soffit so they are not seen. These provide ventilation od the gap between the back-up (block or wood frame) and the brick veneer. Flashing is usually placed under the house wrap and directs any moisture on the surface of the back-up down and away through the weeps.

Even without weeps many brick and block wall perform well. If you do not have the luxury of a block back-up wall, there could possibly be rot or mold in a wood frame wall.

You should have a vapor barrier on the warm side (inside of the insulation) of the wall to prevent condensation (interior moisture) from saturating the insulation and back-up wall (wood or block).

If your insulation is inside the poly, there is a situation where the moisture can condense on the poly since the poly surface is outside the insulation. This can allow the moisture to collect inside the poly and saturate the wall, insulation and sheetrock. If the poly was inside the insulation, it would be "inside" the dew point and be warmer and would not condense the water.

The poly is intended to be a vapor barrier and not breathe. It should just be placed at the proper location in the wall (inside the insulation for heating climates). If this is a north facing wall, the exposure is more critical in the winter and there is no solar warming. The other wall may have a less severe exposure, so the problem did not occur or show up.

I hope I have correctly understood the make-up of your wall. Other wise my comments would be meaningless.

Dick
 
  #7  
Old 02-06-07, 06:30 PM
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Thanks,you have explained alot.From the inside looking out it goes as such...drywall,foam board,plastic sheathing,block.I am not sure if I have anything between the brick veneer and the block like you mentioned.I had opened a few other walls in the same room,but one faced east and one south.I opened them to replace the paneling and install drywall that was never there.It didn't seem to me that any moisture was found including mold.There was a tiny bit on one piece of wood that the paneling was attached to but that was it.I am thinking that maybe because it was due to time and the piece was nailed directly into the block and through the sheathing, leaving small holes where the nails went in; not to mention they knocked some block out for an electrical outlet and it was leaking air in.That has all been remedied.I am thinking and hoping it is just shotty drywall work.In due time I will look for weep holes,but not til it's warmer outside(-17 windchill).Thanks again.
 
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