insulation for exterior wall

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-19-07, 10:54 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: New York
Posts: 305
insulation for exterior wall

i am redoing my kitchen and was wondering what size insulation do I use for my exterior wall. I live in NY just outside NYC. Also do I have to put plastic vapor barrier up or can I use the insulation with the vapor retarder. Also can I insulate around the drain pipes and water pipes or will this cause mold?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-19-07, 01:41 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 230
If the framing is 2x4 then use R13 - 2x6 use R19. Might as well get kraft faced. If you attach the insulation properly you don't need any additional vapor barrier. Go ahead and insulate around the pipes - you will find suitable insulation products specifically for this purpose.
 
  #3  
Old 04-19-07, 02:01 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: New York
Posts: 305
oh so I should not use the standard r13 kraft faced insulation when around the pipes, I should use something special?
 
  #4  
Old 04-19-07, 02:06 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 230
I don't know the configuration of the pipes and yes, you could use the r13 but it would annoying to attach it. I guess you could wrap it with duct tape or something else but if you are insulating runs of pipe, why not get pipe insulation of the right dimension. It will be easy to apply. If you mean that you want to insulate where the pipes penetrate a wall, you are better off using foam.
 
  #5  
Old 04-19-07, 02:57 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: New York
Posts: 305
Actually just got the wall open and the only pipe that runs through the wall is the vent and drain for the sink. The hot and cold are up through the floor. I plan on just using the reg r13 insulation around this area.
 
  #6  
Old 04-19-07, 03:15 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 19,354
I usually will tear a batt of insulation in half, and tuck what I can behind pipes , electrical boxes and such, then apply the other half to cover the top. Rigid foam is a good idea when insulating with fiberglass will be inefficient. Other times you can just score the back of the insulation and cut out the back half (in the shape of the pipe) shove the excess behind the pipe and then fit the cutout batt between the studs.
 
  #7  
Old 04-20-07, 07:02 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 450
If the walls are going to be open anyway, why not do cellulose insulation and solve all your problems at once? The insulation will fill all around the plumbing and electrical boxes and make a MUCH tighter air seal than fiberglass ever will. To properly do the cellulose, you have to pressure pack it into the walls so it won't settle over the years. You can either rent a machine or get some estimates from a few companies. Its more expensive at first, but it will save you more money over time that fiberglass will.
 
Reply


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:53 AM.