vapor barrier over open fiberglass


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Old 05-30-07, 07:24 AM
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vapor barrier over open fiberglass

I have open fiberglass insulation un my basement and garage ceilings and I would like to put up some type of inespensive barrier so my family can use these areas withouth inhaling the fiberglass.
Can I just staple mil6 plastic to seal it off on the cheap or is there any type of hazards involved?

thanks
 
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Old 05-30-07, 02:34 PM
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Vapor barrier will trap moisture and you will likely end up with wet insulation.
 
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Old 05-30-07, 03:10 PM
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zimzum,

You don't say what type of climate you live in but if in a colder area you need to have a vapor barrier to prevent mosture from accumulating when you are in the heating season.
The rule is that the vapor barrier should be on the warm side so if your climate control for a good part of the year is heating it needs to be on the inside.

You need to put plastic sheeting on it but the plastic is a fire hazard and must be covered by a fire resistant barrier by most codes.
If you want to used this area as a living area you realy need to cover it with drywall.
 
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Old 05-31-07, 11:25 AM
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I live in pa , so its cold most of the yr.

Is there anything else i could cover it with on the cheap besides drywall?

Thanks!
 
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Old 05-31-07, 02:37 PM
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what about removing the fiberglass insulation and useing this?
http://reflectixinc.com/
 
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Old 05-31-07, 02:50 PM
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zimzum,

Radiant barrier technology has some merit but it's benefits are grossly overstated.
It also is not cheap.
It would be a very bad idea to use this material in any case but would be rediculous to remove fibreglass and use RB as a replacement.
Not only this but do you know specificaly that it is permited by code to be used as you want and can be by code left uncovered?

It's quite simple that the only material you can use to cover a wall must be fire retardent which is why drywall is the material of choice for this application.

As far as reducing airborne release of fibreglass you can use cardboard if you wish and the only one to be concerned would be your insurance company.
 
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Old 05-31-07, 07:41 PM
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For garages below a living space I believe a common standard is 5/8" sheetrock, sometimes known as "fire code" or "type X" sheetrock. Might be wrong on this and it's only 1/2" for ceilings, but 5/8" on the walls.

In a basement, you could use tyvek. It is a vapor barrier but still somewhat permeable, unlike plastic.
 
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Old 05-31-07, 07:57 PM
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Seems like there should be some sort of mesh material that would allow it to breath but not let fibers escape?
 
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Old 05-31-07, 08:04 PM
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Batt insulation appears to have been obviously properly installed with attached facing (vapor retarder) toward heated areas. It needs to be covered. If the garage is attached to adjoining wall(s) to the structure insulation needs to be covered with fire rated drywall to meet code. Local building codes will dictate what is acceptable. Everything should be done to code. Yes, you could cover the fiberglass with cardboard, but that is a fire hazard and would turn off a potential buyer as would areas where fiberglass is exposed and not be to code. Homeowner insurance could be cancelled. Fire department would have a heart attack. Exposed fiberglass insulation in areas of human activity is a violation of code. Exposed fiberglass can cause irritation to eyes, skin, and respiratory system.

Hopefully, the proper R-value insulation was installed in basement and garage. For instance, R-value will determine how much heat moves in and out of garage into structure. In garages the wall can be be covered with plywood, peg board, or drywall, but the adjoining covering for wall(s) to structure are code required to be fire rated. Some areas require fire rated insulation. Check with local building code office. While you may never start a fire or have a fire source in your garage, there have been homes that have burned due to faulty wiring of vehicle in the garage.
 
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Old 05-31-07, 08:09 PM
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thanks for responding guys!

Ive decided to go with the sheetrock/drywall in the garage after reading that I can rent a lift cradle to help me get them up.
Do you guys reccomend putting 6 mil plastic first then the drywall or is the draywall sufficiant?

another reason I keep trying to throw 6 mil plastic as a vapor barrier into this is because my latest radon test came back higher then what I would like it to be after having a mitigation system installed.

any ideas for the basement ceiling?
I really dont want to throw anything permanent up there because Id like to have easy access to all the wire and pipework.


Thanks!
 
 

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