Insulation in attic

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-24-07, 07:33 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 14
Insulation in attic

Our brick semi was built in the mid 1950's, and the attic is currently insulated with vermiculite and that white, fluffy stuff (looks like that fake snow used at Christmas time). We moved in about 2 months ago, and hired a professional to come out and take samples of the vermiculite to test for asbestos, which came out negative. Still, I would like to remove the vermiculite because I'm paranoid, and also because it's so dusty from the vermiculite I have to wear a dust musk everytime I go up there.

I would like to add the pink insulation this fall, and my question is:

Should I remove the white fluff and vermiculite first? I know the simple answer would be no, but I would feel better if I did. I work at a biotech company in the lab, so I could get protective clothing, gloves, masks, etc for protection. My plan was to fill up trash bags with the white fluff, and then take a shop vac up there and vacuum up the vermiculite. Then I would lay down the pink insulation. Does anybody think this is a good idea, or not necessary?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-24-07, 08:29 AM
Ed Imeduc's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Mountain Williams Missouri
Posts: 18,389
Wink

Id keep what you have there now. Add the pink fiberglass on top of itcross ways. Use only the kind with no V/B or paper on it. Dont forget the foam vents to the over hang. So air can get in the attic from the overhang vents
 
  #3  
Old 07-25-07, 06:28 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 14
Just out of curiosity, why wouldn't you remove it and replace it with the pink stuff?
 
  #4  
Old 07-25-07, 07:10 AM
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 6,126
Insulation in attic

The existing insulation is working fine and does not pose a hazard. What is so great about the color "pink" except the often misleading advertising? - Iver heard of off gassing, mold resistance and fire protection?

Ed is right that applying the pink stuff (or any color) w/o a backing perependicular to the joists is an improvement.

If it was my home, I would blow in cellulose, which will do a better job of providing insulation and coverage if you have trusses.

It all depends on whether you want insulation or mental peace.

Dick
 
  #5  
Old 07-25-07, 10:37 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 14
Originally Posted by Concretemasonry View Post
The existing insulation is working fine and does not pose a hazard. What is so great about the color "pink" except the often misleading advertising? - Iver heard of off gassing, mold resistance and fire protection?
So the pink stuff isn't a good insulator? Then why are they selling it as an insulator? I thought that was all that's available now-a-days, at least that's all I saw at Lowes. What's the pricing with the blown-in cellulose vs. the pink stuff?
 
  #6  
Old 07-25-07, 01:45 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 450
The pink insulation gets a lot more marketing done so thats why its the most popular. Cellulose is more expensive but it will save you more in the long run. It has a higher R-value, controls air infiltration(air leaks), will fill all the holes in the area and is fire resistant(fiberglass is actually fire resistant but it melts so some good that does). Check with your local stores to get prices on cellulose. Beware of Home Depot though. Their cellulose has plastic mixed with it which gets caught in the machines and doesn't offer any insulation. Its just low quality paper they used(wasn't sorted very well). Its easy for a homeowner to blow his/her own attic, walls are a different story.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes