A-Frame insulation


  #1  
Old 10-25-07, 10:01 AM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Ocean Isle Beach, North Carolina
Posts: 1
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
A-Frame insulation

I just bought an old (late 60s-early 70s) A-Frame cottage. We ripped out the old, dark, battered pre-finished paneling so we could replace it with drywall. There is no insulation in the building at all. I know you need to leave air-space in the ceiling -- but in an A-Frame, how do you decide where the wall stops and the ceiling begins? Or is there a special technique to insulating A-Frame building? The studs/joists are 2 x 6, 24 inches on center. I thought about just stuffing them full of insulation on the theory that some insulation is better than none. But would not leaving an air space for the roof create a bigger problem than not having insulation?

Thanks in advance for your input!

Curt Allen-Little
 
  #2  
Old 10-25-07, 02:48 PM
logcabincook's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Rocky Mountain Foothills
Posts: 517
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
We have zero airspace in our solid wood cathedral ceilings - it goes open beams, then tonuge and groove ceiling, then 6" solid insulation, then plywood, then tar paper, then shingles. While the house is not uber-insulated, it's not bad either. So I would think stuffing the cavities you have with the best insulation you can afford would be your best bet.
 
  #3  
Old 10-25-07, 04:13 PM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 424
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
We have a couple of houses where we filled up a 10" space with no problems.
 
  #4  
Old 10-30-07, 09:40 AM
H
Member
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I was just talking about this subject with my coworkers. I also live in an A-Frame and I just started researching how to insulate it.

I wanted to put up rigid insulation on the interior ceiling (which is the inside of the roof tongue & groove),and then cover it up with cedar t&g, but I was warned not to because of moisture getting trapped between the insulation and the ceiling. This moisture would then start to rot my roof from the inside out.

I work at an engineering firm where one of the departments specializes in home inspections, etc., and I want to believe them, but they also suggested googling around to see if anyone else has looked into this.

Currently there is no ridge vent at the peak, so I have a "hot roof". The roof construction is 2-1/4" pine t&g, felt, and then shingles.

Anyone have any suggestions?
 
  #5  
Old 11-21-10, 09:32 PM
B
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Australlia
Posts: 1
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
i have been working in construction co. ......A-Frame display systems can be very usedfull while improving our house.........
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: