blown in cellulose question

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-29-07, 11:13 AM
KevinB's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: the insurance capital
Posts: 107
Question blown in cellulose question

I am going to do my walls this week, was wondering whats the best way to calculate the square footage of this project. Is it just the length of the walls x height x the width of the walls?

Thanks Kevin
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-29-07, 12:48 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: ohio
Posts: 195
For the cellulose i can get at HD, 'greenfiber' one bag will cover 32.8 sq ft of 2x4 wall 16oc for R13
 
  #3  
Old 10-29-07, 02:36 PM
KevinB's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: the insurance capital
Posts: 107
thanks doobs, so it's just height vs width of the wall to determine the square feet? The wall cavity is about 3 1/2 inches deep, I didnt know if that had to be factored in somehow. I couldnt find info on whether it was cubic, or normal sqt
 
  #4  
Old 10-29-07, 05:54 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: ohio
Posts: 195
Yeah you do figure in the thickness of the insulation but do it just like fif you were blowing an open ceiling. The walls are 3.5 inches thick so that times 3.7 is 12.96 for an R value. So then you just look at the total sq footage and how many bags you need to get the desired thickness over that area. Just like a ceiling.
Im going to be blowing some walls myself soon but will need to figure out how to fashion a long flexible fill tube. Ive done walls before but with just a nozzle. Any ideas?
 
  #5  
Old 10-29-07, 06:19 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 450
DO NOT buy the insulation that home depot sells. Its poor quality, has other crap mixed up with it like plastic.

Like doobs said, the bags of insulation will tell you how many SQ feet that bag will cover depending on the thickness.

So figure out the square footage of the wall then read the chart on the bag to determine how many bags you will need.
 
  #6  
Old 10-29-07, 07:05 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: ohio
Posts: 195
What brand and at what store do you suggest to get the cellulose? Also do you have a link or futther info to what you say about greenfiber or is it just your experience.
 
  #7  
Old 10-29-07, 10:59 PM
KevinB's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: the insurance capital
Posts: 107
how is cocoon? That is what I was going to use.

Another question, I checked the basement, and saw mineral wool/ fiberglass material stuffed up in the sides between the basement foundation, joists and wall. Is the fire blocking enough of a barrier for blown in cellulose or should I try to seal that area with something. My concern is it running down the wall and into the basement.
 
  #8  
Old 10-30-07, 05:19 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 450
I've had experience with the greenfiber, AKA Cocoon Insulation. It has plastic in it and it gets wrapped around the augers. We used it about 3 years ago so I don't know if they have changed it but since its Home Depot, I doubt it. But a interesting note: Home Depot is known for cheaping down its products. You might be able to buy this product at a different location and it might not have the plastic in it. We use National Fiber and Benetherm. You can call your local insulation company and see if they will sell either to you. You could use the HD cellulose but the plastic won't offer you the same benefit or protection as the normal paper cellulose will. Also, to clarify, the whole bag isn't full of plastic but there shouldn't be any at all. They don't sort their paper good like they should before manufacturing.

You just need something to stop the cellulose from blowing out. We usually use fiberglass where we can as a blocker.
 
  #9  
Old 11-01-07, 01:19 PM
KevinB's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: the insurance capital
Posts: 107
thanks for the info Adam. I kinda got behind schedule drilling the holes. Plaster is tough to get through, I've been using a 2-1/2 carbide grit to cut through the plaster, then with my other drill I use a 2-1/2 wood/metal hole saw on the lathe.

I've run into some tougher wood, only a half inch thick but having a hard time getting through it, is a 1-1/8 th size hole sufficient enough to put the nozzle through? I can get though the wood no problem with a spade, the hole saw struggles too much.

How long does it take to fill a cavity, from research I've read the estimated time is all over the place, the estimate project times seem to include drilling the holes, patchwork,etc. I plan on doing about 344 sqt.

Thanks again.
 
  #10  
Old 11-02-07, 02:01 PM
KevinB's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: the insurance capital
Posts: 107
opps, forgot to add. I have some old radiators in front of windows, can I just go through the casing? The casing is basic wood, I was thinking I could use a plug cutter on it.

Thanks, Kevin
 
  #11  
Old 11-03-07, 01:07 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 450
Depending on the blower speed and how much the slider is open(feed rate), it should only take a few minutes for each bay to fill.

Not sure about the radiator thing you were talking about but you must have a decorative casing on the radiator right? Then yes you can cut through that.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes