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insulation around bathroom exhaust fan


brianhunter01's Avatar
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Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 305
NY

12-02-07, 11:52 AM   #1  
insulation around bathroom exhaust fan

I just added r19 unfaced insulation to my attic. I had insulation from 1952 that was less than an inch thick. When I got to my exhaust fan for my bathroom ( I added that last year) I went right over the fan and covered it. I want to make sure that is ok. I figured that is the correct way cause I would assume if that was not insulated over then when the warm moisture when running the fan would meet the cold attic air and create water. When I say I covered the fan I mean covered the fan box that sits in the attic. Let me know if that is the correct way. Also will adding all that insulation make a big difference in heat savings. Everyone seems to think that by what I did will cut my gas bill in half. Any feedback is greatly appreciated.

 
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d00bs's Avatar
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Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 195

12-02-07, 01:28 PM   #2  
You will see some savings but really doubt it will be cut in half. Just rolling out some batts is way better than what you have but there are alot of things you could do to enhance your savings cheaply.
First of all where are you located? Most climates call for ALOT more insulation in the attic than you put. Most cold areas call for R38 or R49. Did you roll the batts crosswise to the existing insulation? You are supposed to.
Caulk/foam seal all penetrations into the attic space ie duct chases plumbing chases, wiring, electrical boxes from lights down below. Seal off the chimney chase with sheet metal and/or non combustible caulk. Insulate your attic access door/hatch with weatherstripping and foamboard to R10. Make sure all walls especially the gable end walls have top plates and block them off with foam/foamboard. Make sure your exhaust fan is caulked/foamed around the base where it meets the drywall ceiling. To avoid condensation in the ducting make sure the duct is insulated or covered with insulation.
Lastly you could have gotten a much better bang for your buck by blowing in cellulose which is alot better than using fiberglass.
I dont mean to be critical but these are just a few of the things I have picked up as a homeowner who is in the middle of a big insulation upgrade. I blew in a foot or so of cellulose in my attic over my 2 inch batts and that with a programmable thermostat lowered my bill like 30 percent the first year. DOing a bunch of other air sealing cheaply with foam and caulk got it down to where I used 42% less than the starting point just by insulating correctly. This year im doing alot more like kneewalls, garage ceiling and all exterior walls. I only paid 850 in gass last yr for a 1800sqft house even after upping my set temp so I dont know how much lower it can go after this.

 
adamplghtg's Avatar
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Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 450
NH

12-02-07, 01:37 PM   #3  
d00bs is right about the cellulose. Its far superior to fiberglass. It will cost a bit more but it has a higher r-value and you can install it yourself. Will also help make your attic tighter.

 
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