bathroom wall insulation

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  #1  
Old 11-21-08, 08:48 AM
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bathroom wall insulation

I am remodeling my master bathroom, the tub is on an outside wall, wall construction is sheathing on 2X4 on gyp board. What is best way and material to use to insulate the wall so ithe tile is not so cold, I am located in Michigan
 
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Old 11-21-08, 10:38 AM
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Hi BDG, I guess we know where you like to relax Just kidding! Outside walls can get cold and when they are seperated from the heat source, like a radiator along the wall, really cold. Bath tubs frequently have a hidden problem, it is the space underneath the tub and when it is on an outside wall, that space is exposed to a very cold surface. Is the bathroom over a basement or on a second floor? Over a basement you might be able to see the hole where the drain and water lines come down and sometimes get a look up inside. If it is on a second floor, is one end up against a partitian wall with a room on the other side?
Tell us what point you are at in your project and if the current tile wall is coming out. Also if there is any insulation in the current wall?
Bud
 
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Old 11-21-08, 01:35 PM
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whole bathroom has been gutted down to the studs and there is 3-1/2" batt insulation, Bathroom is above a basement, floor is insulated, the 5' length of the bathtub is on an outside wall

Thanx
 
  #4  
Old 11-21-08, 03:31 PM
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OK, before we talk about what you can add for more insulation, let's talk about why it was cold in the first place. One: No sheetrock behind the tub, just insulation. Without an air barrier the space below the tub would have gotten very cold and circulated air up into the studs above. Two: Shower curtains. Anything that blocks the heat, reduces the temperature. Three: The ceiling below is insulated. But how? The rim joist is the outside perimeter of that cavity. It is very common to have air leakage between the foundation and the sill plate and between any and all wood that has seams extending to the outside. If you can get back into that basement ceiling, you need to air seal that rim joist. Once sealed, you need to pack that cavity full of fiberglass under the entire bathtub area. Four: I've never done this, but I see no value for having the open space under the tub. It's a dead air space and from my point of view could be filled with insulation. How to get it in there, I don't know, but take a look. If you can get back into the basement ceiling, you might be able to cut some access holes and cover them when done. Now, your 3 1/2" insulation is probably R-11 or R-13. Your options are replacing it with; spray in foam, they have some DIY products; cut and fit rigid foam and fill the stud bays; or they make a high density 3 1/2" fiberglass R-15. But you will need to be sure you have sheetrock, or other, floor to ceiling to re-establish the air barrier. Adding a layer of polly wouldn't hurt. If you are considering insulating other areas of the house, where you could use cellulose, then maybe you could justify getting a machine and blowing it in. One more thought, I get involved with helping seniors create a warm space, where they can stay warm without heating the entire house to 80 degrees. If a toasty tub is important to you, there are many ways to heat it up, especially if it is well insulated from the outside. Do you have hot air or hot water for heat? Your turn Bud
 
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